Best Cheesecake Brownies

Cheesecake Brownie Recipe

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These cheesecake brownies are so delicious! They’re full of chocolate, fudgy goodness with the rich, creamy zing of cheesecake. Grab a brownie buddy because these are too good to keep to yourself!

Best Cheesecake Brownies are easy enough to make and enjoy at home but pack an impressive punch at a party or casual gathering. Taking a traditional homemade brownie and adding a cheesecake topping makes these an elegant, rich upgrade and a must-try. You can leave them layered or marble them for a fancier look.

 

What kind of Cocoa Powder should I use?

Cocoa has become a popular cooking item and more cocoa powders are popping up in stores all the time. This is because cocoa, in and of itself, is a healthy food. Any of these options will work as long they are pure, unsweetened, cocoa powder.  A dutch process cocoa powder will also work. Sweetened cocoa not only has sugar in it, but usually some flavoring and sometimes dry milk solids. This recipe calls for just the right amount of sugar—using sweetened cocoa will disrupt the flavor, texture and sweetness of these brownies.

 

Should I make them in advance?

Many people enjoy a warm brownie. These will serve up nicely warm, but to give the topping a chance to set, they are best made in advance enough to cool completely.

 

Will the cream cheese make the brownies too gooey?

Just like cheesecake, the cream cheese in this recipe will solidify when baked. However, if you like your brownies a little more cakey than fudgy, you can add an extra egg to the brownie batter.

 

If you like this recipe, you may also be interested in these other delicious brownie recipes:

 

Watch the video below where Rachel will walk you through every step of this recipe. Sometimes it helps to have a visual, and we’ve always got you covered with our cooking show. You can find the complete collection of recipes on YouTubeFacebook Watch, or our Facebook Page, or right here on our website with their corresponding recipes.

 

Best Cheesecake Brownies

These cheesecake brownies are so delicious! They’re full of chocolate, fudgy goodness with the rich, creamy zing of cheesecake. Grab a brownie buddy because these are too good to keep to yourself!

Prep Time15 mins

Cook Time40 mins

Total Time55 mins

Print Pin Rate

Servings: 9 large brownies

Ingredients

Brownie

  • 1/2 cup salted butter melted + 2 tablespoons
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup melted milk chocolate chips
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup milk chocolate chips

Cheesecake

  • 8 ounces cream cheese
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a metal 9×9 pan with parchment paper.

  • Pour melted butter into a large mixing bowl. Whisk in sugar by hand until smooth, 30 seconds.

  • Add in eggs and vanilla extract. Whisk 1 minute. Whisk in melted chocolate until combined and smooth.

  • Use a rubber spatula to stir in flour, cocoa powder, and salt until just combined. Stir in whole chocolate chips. Pour into prepared pan and smooth out.

  • Make the cheesecake batter: use a hand mixer to whip together cream cheese and sugar until smooth, about 90 seconds. Add in egg and vanilla extract . Mix until combined, about 30 seconds.

  • Drizzle cheesecake batter on top of brownie batter in 9×9 pan. Use a knife or a toothpick to swirl designs, if desired. 

  • Bake in the preheated oven for 35-40 minutes. Let cool completely before slicing. 

Nutrition

Calories: 508kcal | Carbohydrates: 59g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 28g | Saturated Fat: 16g | Cholesterol: 130mg | Sodium: 348mg | Potassium: 108mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 48g | Vitamin A: 16.5% | Vitamin C: 0.1% | Calcium: 7.8% | Iron: 8.9%

Course: Dessert

Cuisine: American

Keyword: Cheesecake Brownies

Cheesecake Brownies

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Maple Bacon Cinnamon Rolls | Ashlee Marie

maple bacon cinnamon rolls

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It doesn’t get much better than breads! And cinnamon rolls are pretty much a perfect food. By adding bacon into these cinnamon rolls and maple into the cream cheese frosting you’re adding a little savory to the sweet and making something already delicious even better!

What I think about Maple Bacon Cinnamon Rolls

I think I’ve established over the years that I love maple bacon recipes. These cinnamon rolls are just the latest and honestly probably my favorite ever!

I’m one of those people who likes adding syrup to my sausage so it’s really no surprise that these maple bacon cinnamon rolls are my all time favorite breakfast foods!

Soft, sweet cinnamon rolls with diced crispy, salty bacon and topped with a maple cream cheese frosting – I’m drooling just thinking about them!

Just take me to the cinnamon roll recipe already!

If you’d rather skip my tips and tricks for the perfect cinnamon roll, and get straight to baking this maple bacon cinnamon goodness — scroll to the bottom of the page where you’ll find the printable recipe card.

maple bacon cinnamon roll recipe

Tips for the perfect maple bacon cinnamon roll

-My first tip for all yeast breads – add half the flour first, mix until the dough is smooth and slowly add more flour 1/2 C at a time until the dough starts to pull away and clean the sides. This will keep your dough fluffy vs dense and tough.

-the larger you roll out the dough the more swirls you’ll have, they will also be thinner swirls so it’s up to you – thicker and less swirls or more, thinner swirls. Personally I like more swirls for more cinnamon and bacon.

-Don’t skimp on the cinnamon sugar filling, I like mine fairly thick, it means more of a mess when cutting the rolls and placing them but it also means a more gooey filling – which is a win for me.

-Don’t skimp on the rise time – when the recipe says let rise until double I mean it – even if it takes longer than the estimated time – the temperature, altitude and weather will all effect the rise time.

-Finally – do you use a glaze or frosting for cinnamon rolls? Personally I like cream cheese frosting. I like the thick creamy frosting spread all over the cinnamon rolls and melting into all the swirls. The glaze is just not enough for me – sweetness without flavor.

maple bacon cinnamon rolls process

To make these cinnamon rolls you’ll need

Maple Bacon Cinnamon Rolls

If you love these fair foods as much as I do, I’d love a 5 star review. Be sure to share on social media and tag me if you make it @ashleemariecakes! If you want to stay updated on new recipes sign up for my newsletter and join my Facebook Group!

maple bacon homemade cinnamon rolls process

If you loved these maple bacon cinnamon rolls, you’ll love these other Maple Bacon recipes!

Maple Bacon Cheesecake | Maple Bacon Cupcakes | Maple Bacon Fudge

More amazing Breakfast recipes!

German Pancakes | Traditional Liege Waffles | French Toast

maple bacon homemade cinnamon rolls

To watch me make 5 different cinnamon rolls and talk about how to tweak the base recipe to create any flavor play the video in the recipe card. You can find all my cooking show style recipe videos on YouTube, or my short recipe videos on Facebook Watch, or my Facebook Page, or right here on our website with their corresponding recipes.

maple bacon cinnamon roll

Maple Bacon Cinnamon Rolls

Course: Breakfast

Cuisine: American

Keyword: cinnamon roll recipe, cinnamon rolls, homemade cinnamon rolls, maple bacon, maple bacon cinnamon roll

Servings: 12 cinnamon rolls

Calories: 808 kcal

Author: Ashlee Marie

Ingredients

dough

  • 1 1/2 Tbsp Active Dry Yeast
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp granulated sugar
  • 1/2 C water warmed, between 100 and 120.
  • 8 Tbsp butter melted
  • 3/4 cup whole milk warmed
  • 3/4 C granulated sugar
  • 1 lrg egg
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 5 C all purpose flour plus more for dusting counters

Cinnamon/Sugar Layer

  • 8 Tbsp butter softened
  • 3/4 C packed light brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 Tbsp ground cinnamon
  • 12 slices thick center cut bacon

Frosting

  • 8 ounces full fat cream cheese softened
  • 4 Tbsp butter softened
  • 2-3 cups powdered sugar
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • 1/2 tsp maple

Instructions

  1. bake the bacon 375 degrees 15 mins, stop before it gets crisp then chop

  2. lightly stir the yeast, sugar and warm water together in the bottom of your mixing bowl

  3. let sit 5-10 mins (until double is size) to activate the yeast

  4. With the mixer on low add the milk, butter, sugar, egg and salt – mix until smooth.

  5. Add the flour 1/2 C at a time (you might not need the full 5th C) until the dough starts to pull away from the sides and clean the bowl – do not over add flour – it will end up too dense.

  6. now beat/knead until the dough stretches without tearing.

  7. Pour it into a greased bowl, cover with a damp towel and let rise, someplace warm, until doubled in size, about 60 mins.

  8. flour your counter top and pour the dough on to it, knead it LIGHTLY and roll it out into a long rectangle, about 15×26 inches. You want it thin, that will give you more twists, about 1/4 inch thick

  9. cover the dough from edge to edge with the soft butter. Use it all, don’t be stingy.

  10. mix the sugars and cinnamon and cover the dough entirely, again use it all, it will be thick.

  11. sprinkle the chopped bacon over the top, spread evenly

  12. Starting at one of the 15 inch sides roll it up.

  13. slice into 12 rolls, 1 1/4 inch thick

  14. place the rolls in a 9×13 pan let and rise slightly, until poofy, about 30-45 mins.

  15. Preheat the oven to 350

  16. bake 18-23 mins

  17. When it’s golden brown and doesn’t feel squishy anymore it’s done!

  18. Beat the frosting ingredients together until smooth and spread across the top

Recipe Video

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6 Tasty Cooking Classes in Melbourne

cooking classes melbourne - typical Australian food

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Looking for Cooking Classes in Melbourne? Want to learn more about what is Typical Australian Food? I’m sure any travelling foodie will love to get involved in a tasty cooking experience during their trip to Melbourne, so that’s why we’ve put together this handy list to help you find the tastiest cooking classes in Melbourne.

Australia is known for its multicultural history and Melbourne is certainly a melting pot for diversity when it comes to food. That’s why it’s a great idea to try out the numerous cooking classes in Melbourne to get a hands on experience cooking these dishes. Learn about local produce, today’s international influences, and discover Australia’s fascinating food heritage. 

Disclaimer: This post may contain affiliate links which pay me a commission if you choose to purchase/book something. You do not pay extra using this link. Thank you for supporting this blog by purchasing through these links.

 

6 Tasty Cooking Classes in Melbourne – Make Typical Australian Food & More…

 

Enjoy a Modern Australian Cooking Class with a Professional Chef in Melbourne

cooking classes melbourne - typical Australian food

cooking classes Melbourne – typical Australian food

 

Get to have your own private cooking class in the Melbourne home of a professional chef. In this class, you will make 3 typical Australian food dishes like oysters or trout and top it all off with dessert and a glass of wine. 

This private half day class is a great way to learn about Australia’s food heritage, typical local ingredients and how to put them all together to make homemade typical Australian food.

Click Here for more information or to Check Prices & Availability 

 

Cook Contemporary Australian Cuisine From Native Produce in a Local Home

cooking classes melbourne - typical Australian food

cooking classes Melbourne – typical Australian food

 

Meet Ella your local host and instructor for your cooking class in Melbourne and visit her quaint art deco home in the heart of inner Melbourne. In this class, you will learn to make an appetizer like finger limes and lemon myrtle spice mix, a main dish – for example, peppered Kangaroo, and for dessert beach bananas and lamington. Truly typical Australian foods – yum!  

Also, learn about traditional Aboriginal herbs and spices that have been ethically sourced and locally grown in Aboriginal farms and their uses in cooking. 

Click Here for more information and to Check Prices & Availability 

 

Dumpling Making Party

Cooking Courses Melbourne

Cooking Courses Melbourne

 

Melbourne is known around the world for it’s Chinatown. Full of exceptional food and of course dumplings!

In this hands on class, you can learn how to make Asian style dumplings yourself and impress your friends at dinner parties and pot lucks! Learn the art of making the perfect dough for Japanese, Chinese, and Vietnamese dumplings and then filling them using a variety of meats and vegetables. 

This quick 2 hour cooking class in Melbourne will give you the knowledge you need to become a dumpling pro and at the end, you can all sit down with a glass of sparkling wine and eat them all! YUM!

Click Here for more information and to Check Prices & Availability 

 

Spice Factory 3-Hour Indian Cooking Class

Cooking Courses Melbourne

Cooking Courses Melbourne

 

Always wanted to learn the art of making an Indian Thali – but have no plans to visit India anytime soon? Why not take this unique cooking class in Melbourne and discover the secret to preparing the perfect home cooked thali. 

You’ll first watch a demonstration on how the meals are prepared and then it will be your turn to make up to 5 separate items that will make up the thali. During this class you’ll also discover the culinary heritage behind the Indian thali, and what makes every element of it so important to a balanced diet. 

You also get to take home the recipes so you can recreate all of the dishes when you return home.

Click Here for more information and to Check Prices & Availability

 

Private Market Tour and Australian Cooking Class with a Local Chef in her Home

 

cooking classes melbourne - typical Australian food

cooking classes Melbourne – typical Australian food

 

Meet your friendly host and local chef Tonya who has trained at international cooking schools like, Le Cordon Bleu and the Ritz Escoffier in Paris and La Varenne l’Ecole de Cuisine in Burgundy and get ready to learn about typical Australian food in this 6 hour cooking class in Melbourne.

During this day of foodie indulgence, you get to visit one of the biggest local markets close to Melbourne. Here with Tonya you will shop for local produce including fish, meat, vegetables, nuts, seeds, herbs and all of the ingredients you will need for your private cooking class. 

The menu can vary depending on what is available at market but you can be sure to make 3 courses from scratch. Dishes could be anything from oysters and verjus jelly with eschallot dressing, to green peppercorn and chive jus, or slow roasted ocean trout with creamy, lemony mayonnaise. 

If you are Vegetarian, low-carb or gluten free options are certainly available. 

Click Here for more information and to Check Prices & Availability

 

Private Italian Cooking School at Pizzini Wines

(Driving distance to Melbourne)

Cooking class Melbourne - Italian cooking classes Melbourne

Cooking class Melbourne – Italian cooking classes Melbourne

 

If you are looking to escape the city for a day trip then this is a great option to get out, explore a local vineyard, and learn some Italian cooking skills as well.  

Located at the Pizzini Wines family estate you will experience true hospitality as the Pissini family teaches you how to make Italian style dishes. You’ll also get a tour of the winery and barrel room where you can taste Italian wine varieties including Sangiovese, Nebbiolo and Canaiolo as they age in barrels. 

After the tour, it’s lunchtime where you get to eat your sensational Italian creations with a lovely glass of the family’s reserve range wine. 

Click Here for more information and to Check Prices and Availability. 

 

Looking for more foodie activities in and near Melbourne? Here’s a few great options:

 

 

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6 Best Rome Cooking Class / Pasta Making Class in Rome

Rome cooking class - cooking classes in rome italy

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Looking for the very best when it comes to booking a Rome Cooking Class? How about a Pasta making class in Rome? Then look no further as we have taken the hard work out for you in this handy little article to make sure you get well fed and have a fantastic Italian vacation.

Rome is ALL about the food and what better way to really learn about Italian cuisine than by taking a cooking class. But this is your trip of a lifetime right? You don’t want just any old cooking class, you’re after the BEST cooking classes in Rome! Something authentic, informative and above all else Tasty!

We hear you! That’s why we have put together the 6 Best Rome Cooking Classes for you to consider for your next vacation, we’ve also added in some fantastic Pasta Making Classes in Rome too as quite often this is a separate class to say pizza or gelato. 

6 Best Rome Cooking Class / Pasta Making Class in Rome

4-Hour Combo Pizza and Pasta Cooking Class

Rome cooking class – cooking classes in Rome Italy

 

Learn the art of making two of Italy’s finest dishes – pizza and pasta. In this 4 hour cooking class learn up to 10 different pasta shapes and also how to cook an authentic Neapolitan pizza. 

This class completely kid friendly as well so bring them along and all experience this tasty Rome cooking class together.

Click Here For More Information and to Check Prices and Availability 

 

Italian Food Half-Day Cooking Course in Rome

Rome cooking class - cooking classes in Rome Italy

Rome cooking class – cooking classes in Rome Italy

 

Learn the secrets of true Italian cooking with this half-day course. During this Rome cooking class, you’ll learn how to make 4 tasty Italian creations all expertly paired with Italian wine. With your International chef, you’ll learn how to pick the best seasonal ingredients and prepare a classic Italian meal. 

Click Here for more information and Check Price & Availability

 

Roman Pasta Class: Carbonara & More

Pasta Making Class Rome

Pasta Making Class Rome – Carbonara and more

 

Get a truly authentic Pasta Making Class experience by taking a cooking class with a local! Learn how to make 3 traditional Roman pastas in a private home right near the Colosseum. There’s no better way to learn how to cook real Italian pasta dishes than by taking a Pasta Making Class in someone’s home. 

Click Here for more Information and Check Prices & Availability 

 

Ice-Cream Making in Rome for Gelato Lovers

Gelato Making Class Rome

Gelato Making Class Rome

 

There is nothing quite like trying authentic gelato in Italy for the very first time….or second or third. Italian gelato is something special that you just can’t get anywhere else, we know people try to make gelato all over the world but nothing beats Italy – trust us!

In this Gelato Making Class Rome, you’ll discover the secrets to making the perfect gelato which includes learning how to make three different flavours, Produce your own gelato and get to taste other gelato flavours as well! A dessert lover dream! 

Click Here for more information and to Check Prices & Availability

 

The Home Pasta Factory: Fettuccine, Lasagne, Ravioli, Orecchiette, Gnocchi

Pasta Making Class Rome - best cooking classes in rome

Pasta Making Class Rome – best cooking classes in Rome

This Rome cooking class will teach you the right cooking techniques to make your own Italian homemade pasta. Impress your friends when you return from your Italian vacation with the ability to make pasta classics like fettuccine, ravioli, gnocchi, lasagna, cannelloni, and more all from scratch. 

At the end, everyone joins together to have a family meal accompanied with local Italian wine.

Click Here for more information and to Check Prices & Availability 

 

 

Pizza Making Class with Winery Tour and Wine Tasting in Rome’s Countryside

Rome cooking class - cooking classes in Rome Italy

Rome cooking class – cooking classes in Rome Italy

Last but certainly not least we wanted to add in a foodie experience that’s only 25 minutes away from Rome….not far at all! And it’s an experience any foodie is going to want to have on their trip to Italy. 

Head outside the hustle and bustle of Rome to Minardi Historic Farmhouse here you will get to see what life is like in the Italian countryside and also indulge in wine tasting and olive oil tasting before meeting their local Pizza Master who will teach you how to prepare traditional Roman pizza, including “Margherita” and “Capricciosa“ varieties. You might also learn a few of the secrets to preparing the perfect dough! 

Click Here for more information and to Check Prices & Availability 

>>>

So there you have it 6  amazing Rome cooking classes that will be the absolute highlight of your Italian vacation. If you are looking for restaurant or hotel recommendations in Rome we have those too! We also have some great posts about other areas of Italy that are sure to get you drooling. 

And Don’t Forget To Grab A Copy Of our Free Tourist Map Of Rome – 70+ Rome Tourist Attractions

We’ve put together a google map overlay with all our top picks of attractions, restaurants, foodie experiences, accommodation, transport locations and more! Save yourself a bunch of time by having our huge list of Rome highlights instantly at your fingertips. Get Our Rome Tourist Map NOW – Click Here.

  • Works on any device over 4G or wifi – follow the map as you travel
  • It’s FREE!
  • 70+ highlighted spots to visit
  • Super easy to use on google maps
  • Every Restaurant in the article – and more!

 

 

 

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Baked Ziti – CincyShopper

Baked Ziti on a plate.

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The perfect pasta dish every time is this Easy Baked Ziti. A great casserole that is made with beef and sausage meat blend, tender pasta, delicious tomato sauce and lots of cheese. It’s ideal for graduation parties, family get-togethers, and Sunday dinners! 

Baked Ziti

Pasta dinners are some of my favorites. I make our American Goulash as well as my Lasagna Roll-Ups quite frequently. I can make these dishes quickly on busy weeknights. Baked Ziti is another one of those dishes that fit in this easy dinner category. It’s an amazing dish, it’s delicious, it’s also really simple! You could plan to make it ahead or it’s a dinner that’s great thrown together at the last minute. You’ll be able to get dinner on the table in no time.

Baked Ziti in a casserole dish.

There is just something about Italian dishes loaded up with baked cheese that I can’t get enough of. I’d have to say that shredded mozzarella is one of my favorite cheeses to use with Italian pasta dishes. If you make this Baked Ziti the way I do, it’s going to be delicious every single time. It’s so good that everyone will love it. I’ve never heard a single complaint about this dish and I’ve made it dozens of times.

Fork with cheesy baked ziti.

I think one of my favorite parts about this meal is that it’s going to feed a lot of people. If you have a big family or you just want to have leftovers, Baked Ziti is a great option. I’ll sometimes even make a double batch and add one to the freezer, to pull out later. I like to use a 60/40 beef and pork blend of meat, to help give this pasta dish even more flavor. This is the ultimate family dinner that your family will ask for again and again.

Easy Baked Ziti on a white plate.

Where Did Baked Ziti Originate From?

Also known as Ziti al Forno, this is a popular dish across many Italian towns. The way Baked Ziti is made in our kitchens is way different than the way it’s made across Italy. Oven baked pasta is truly the winner here. It dates back to the Middle Ages. It’s safe to say that you’re carrying on a very old tradition when you make Baked Ziti right in your own home.

Baked ziti pasta on a plate with text.

Ingredients to Make Baked Ziti

  • Pasta – I use a Penne
  • Ground Beef and Sausage (I used a packaged blend)
  • Diced Tomatoes
  • Marinara Sauce
  • Ricotta Cheese
  • Mozzarella Cheese ( I use fresh, not pre-shredded)
  • Eggs
  • Garlic
  • Italian Seasonings (Oregano and Basil)
  • Parsley

How to Make Baked Ziti

Before you get started with making this delicious dish, you’ll want to preheat the oven to 350 degrees. I like to do this before I start prepping dinner because then the oven is ready to go. On those busy weeknights, this meal will be a true lifesaver. It’s such an easy dinner idea, anyone can do it! You’ll want to start your food prep by dicing the onion. I use a half onion in this recipe. If you would like to keep the dish kid-friendly, go ahead and omit the onion or you can puree it.

Add the beef and pork mixture to a pan to brown. I usually add the garlic and diced onion at this step. After my mixture is brown, I drain most of the grease.

Next, you’ll want to add the diced tomatoes, seasonings and the marinara sauce to the pan. I stir to combine.

I cook my pasta according to package directions. I remove at an almost al dente. Immediately drain and rinse with cold water to keep your pasta from cooking any further. You don’t want to make the pasta super done because it will continue to cook while in the oven baking.

I really enjoy shredding my own mozzarella cheese, not only does it taste better, but it looks best when it’s done. In a pinch, you could use shredded mozzarella from a bag, but I just prefer to use fresh and shred myself. If you have never shredded fresh mozzarella, you can check out this post over on for How to Shred Mozzarella.

In a large bowl, mix the ricotta, mozzarella, two eggs, and parsley together. This is going to be the mixture that makes the whole Baked Ziti recipe come together.

Start by adding a layer of the meat mixture to the bottom of the pan. You’ll want to use a deep baking dish for this meal.

Add a layer of pasta.

Then add a layer of the cheese mixture, on top of the pasta.

And then another layer of the meat mixture.

Another layer of pasta.

Add another layer of the cheese mixture.

Finally, add the last layer of the meat sauce.

Finish prepping the dish by adding a layer of shredded mozzarella.

Cook until done and serve warm. I like to add parmesan cheese to the top of my pasta. Give it a try!

Can You Make Baked Ziti Ahead of Time?

Baked Ziti is one of those dishes that you can prep ahead of time. Since the meat and pasta are cooked before it’s baked, this makes a great prep ahead dish. So, the answer is yes! Go ahead and make the Baked Ziti ahead of time for your graduation parties, large gatherings, and Sunday dinners!

Looking for some great side dishes to serve with your pasta? Be sure to see some of these recipes that I have shared:

RECIPE

Baked Ziti

The perfect pasta dish every time is Baked Ziti. The cheese, pasta, and tomato sauce mix together just right. This dish is ideal for graduation parties, family get-togethers, and Sunday dinners!

Course Main Course

Cuisine Italian

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp Olive Oil
  • 2 tsp Minced Garlic
  • 1/2 large Onion diced
  • 2 ib Ground Beef and Pork
  • 28 oz Marinara Sauce
  • 28 oz canned Diced Tomatoes
  • 1 tsp Oregano
  • 1 tsp Basil
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • 1/2 tsp Black Pepper
  • 1 lb Penne Pasta
  • 1 lb Mozzarella grated
  • 12 oz Ricotta
  • 2 Eggs
  • 2 tbsp Parsley

Instructions

  • In a large skillet over medium heat, heat the olive oil.

  • Add ground meat, diced onions and garlic.

  • Break up meat as it cooks, and continue until until all meat is browned.

  • Drain off most of the excess fat.

  • Add the marinara sauce, tomatoes, spices, salt and pepper.

  • Stir and simmer for 30 minutes.

  • Bring a large pot of water to a boil and cook the pasta until al dente.

  • Drain the pasta and rinse under cool water.

  • Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

  • Reserve 1/2 cup mozzarella for later.

  • In a bowl, mix remaining mozzarella, the ricotta, parsley and eggs.

  • Stir until just combined.

  • Spread 1/3 of tomato sauce mixture on bottom of pan.

  • Spread 1/2 of the pasta over sauce.

  • Spread 1/2 egg and cheese mixture over pasta.

  • Spread 1/3 of tomato sauce mixture over cheese mixture.

  • Spread remaining pasta over sauce.

  • Spread remaining egg and cheese mixture over pasta.

  • Spread remaining tomato sauce mixture over cheese mixture.

  • Sprinkle top with reserved mozzarella cheese.

  • Bake 20 minutes until bubbling.

  • Garnish with parsley.

Have you made this recipe?Snap a pic and show us on Instagram or Facebook.Tag me @Cincyshopper or #cincyshopper.

 

 



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Pasta-Free Zucchini Lasagna

Zucchini Lasagna

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Zucchini Lasagna is pasta-free yet tasty and rich. It’s the perfect low-carb, gluten-free lasagna and a great way to sneak extra veggies in.

Our traditional recipe for The Most Amazing Lasagna is a popular treat with our friends and family any time we serve it. This Zucchini Lasagna rendition is a great low-carb, gluten-free and lighter fare option. Zucchini is a nutrient-dense food and makes it a super healthy alternative to the pasta in traditional lasagna. It’s also a delicious way to work in more vegetables. Make sure to invite friends when you make this dish because this one is a crowd pleaser! 

Zucchini carries a lot of water, so it is important to follow the salting step when you wash it. This helps to pull some of the moisture out.     

 

Will the zucchini make it taste different?

Zucchini has a mild, summer squash flavor that blends perfectly with Italian style dishes. It complements the bold flavors of the spices, sausage and cheese just right, so the zucchini itself is hardly noticeable.

 

Can I make this into vegetarian zucchini lasagna?

Yes. The Italian sausage and ground beef in this recipe can be completely omitted to make the recipe vegetarian. Instead of browning the sausage and beef, simply sauté the onion in 1 tablespoon of olive oil for a few minutes instead. You can even use a meat substitute like tofu or jackfruit.

 

 If you like this recipe, you may be interested in these other lasagna recipes:

 

Watch the video below where Rachel will walk you through every step of this recipe. Sometimes it helps to have a visual, and we’ve always got you covered with our cooking show. You can find the complete collection of recipes on YouTubeFacebook Watch, or our Facebook Page, or right here on our website with their corresponding recipes.

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Lisbon Food: What To Eat In Lisbon (35 Dishes)

Lisbon Cooking Class: Our Chef Helps One Of Our Fellow Guests

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Lisbon Food Experiences & What To Eat In Lisbon: For our foodies guide to Lisbon we search out typical Portuguese food both from the Lisbon restaurants where the locals eat and by checking out the Portuguese street food scene. We dig into the history and style of the cuisine with a guided Lisbon food tour as well as getting our hands messy taking a Lisbon cooking class.

As one of the most important maritime cities in world history, Lisbon has influenced and been influenced, by ingredients from all over the world, especially since the age of discovery in the 15th/16th century. Africa, India, The Americas and more. Find below a list of what to eat in Lisbon – more than 35 dishes to discover – as well as the stories behind the most typical Lisbon food.

Lisbon Food: A Historical Introduction

Portugal is a 35,000 square mile strip of land along the Atlantic Ocean. At the very end of southern continental Europe, bordered only by Spain and the Atlantic. With over 500 miles (800KM) of coastline, seafood takes an important place in typical Portuguese food culture.

But Portugal’s proximity to the ocean also played a part in their colonial past, as they both traded and conquered their way around the globe. The back and forth of ingredients from both east and west has shaped Portuguese cuisine. The Portuguese also left their culinary mark all over, from Brazil to Mozambique, Macau to Goa, and many more.

Portugal was once occupied by the Romans, who are attributed with introducing wheat, onions, garlic, olives, and grapes. Later, around 711 AD the Moors from North Africa invaded, bringing rice, figs, lemons, oranges, and almond trees.

Modern day Portugal found its roots in the north of the country where a Visigoth state eventually became called Portugal and slowly took back lands south towards the very south coast of the Peninsula, known as the Algarve coast today.

By the 15th century, the great Age of Discovery had begun. Before the Americas were discovered in 1492, Portuguese explorers had already claimed many Atlantic islands like Cape Verde, The Azores, Madeira and also taken lands south along the coast of Africa.

In the 15th century, Prince Henry the Navigator instructed Portuguese explorers to bring back any exotic fruits, nuts, and plants they found. New ingredients and the future spice trade would have a big effect on Portuguese cuisine.

As Portugal gained new lands, things like tomatoes and potatoes were brought back home. African coffee was sent to create massive plantations in Brazil. And vice versa, chilis from Brazil were brought to Portugal’s African colonies – and the little chilis are called “Piri Piri” in Portugal and used in many dishes. Also, spices like curry powder and cinnamon returned regularly from India.

The Lisbon area has been inhabited since Neanderthal times, with the first permanent settlements appearing around 2500 BC. Lisbon became the capital of Portugal in 1255 AD.

As a cosmopolitan capital, in Lisbon, you’ll find cuisine from all over Portugal, as well as plenty of international food, especially dishes from ex-Portuguese colonies, like Angola, Goa, Brazil and many more. And, more recently, immigrant cuisine from new arrivals on the culinary scene, like Nepal.

But, in this article, our focus is on traditional foods of Portugal that were either created in Lisbon or mainland Portugal and which are everyday favourites you can find all over Lisbon.

Before we get onto the list of what to eat in Lisbon, a couple of Lisbon food experiences that are ideal for visitors.

 

Lisbon Cooking Class

We love cooking classes. Learning about the food as you also learn hands-on how to make it, not only results in a delicious evening but also in getting the knowledge to take that little bit of flavour away and make it when you get back home. When it comes to what to eat in Lisbon, one of our top recommendations has to be the Portuguese food you learn to make yourself!

Lisbon Cooking Class: Our Chef Helps One Of Our Fellow Guests

We teamed up with Cookly who offer incredible cooking classes around the world including the one we did in Lisbon with Cooking Lisbon. We chose the gourmet cooking class to go a little beyond the standard class but there’s plenty to choose from.

Our expert chef shared some unexpected stories about Portuguese culinary culture. Like, the slang term for a spatula is the same as the name of the ex-dictator who was overthrown in 1974. Because he was very frugal and wouldn’t waste anything!

We also got some pro tips for cooking sea bass fillet perfectly (it was soooo tasty!). Plus some cool ideas that you might not find in restaurants, like making your own “Portuguese bacon bits”… Actually, they are churiço (chorizo), whizzed in a blender, then baked until crispy. Throw that on top of your creamy chicken fricassee for a salty-porky kick. How had we never thought of doing this!!!

Lisbon Cooking Class: Chicken Fricassee - Portuguese Style

Chicken Fricassee – Portuguese Style

Lisbon Cooking Class: Megsy get's stirring

Megsy get’s stirring

But, the biggest draw of the cooking class was definitely going hands-on in the cooking with the rest of the guests. It was a very interactive class, and our host was 100% on top of everything from start to finish. Keeping everyone happy. Keeping an eye that prep and cooking were being done just right and also that wine glasses were never empty. (very important!)

The highlight of the dishes we made (which do vary depending on the season and market that day) was the Pastéis de Tentúgal (pictured below). Crispy phyllo pastries from Tentúgal, in north-central Portugal. Sweet, eggy filled and oven crispy pastries. I had to eat quite a few, for quality control purposes. The technique for getting the filling just right involved mixing egg yolks with hot syrup. Something you could easily mess up and curdle. But our expert teacher helped us get them perfect.

Lisbon Cooking Class: Pastéis de Tentugal

Cooking Class Lisbon: Pastéis de Tentúgal

Check out the gourmet cooking class.

Or take a look at the other cooking classes & market tours available via Cookly

Book a cooking class in Portugal

Take A Lisbon Food Tour

Our preferred way to get rapidly orientated with a city and its food is to take a food tour with a local expert guide. To try as many things as possible in the shortest time, we took the “Lisbon’s Favourite Food Tour: The 10 Tastings” With Luciana @ WithLocals.

The tour company’s model is specifically to connect visitors with local guides for intimate small group or private tours where you can get personal attention from the guides. We ask a lot of questions, so smaller groups are ideal for us. You can even book the guide of your choice, rather than just the tour itself, so you can read their reviews and see who is the best fit for your style. Some are foodies, some are teachers, some are music lovers, and depending on the tour you want to take, With Locals will have the perfect guide to suit you and your travel tastes. 

Lisbon Food | Typical Portuguese Food: Bifana

Typical Portuguese Food: Bifana

On our tour date, we actually got a private tour – we have to admit we hadn’t actually paid attention to this part of the booking lol. It doesn’t bother us if we are with people or not but private tours are something this particular tour guarantees. Just your group and your guide ready to go out and eat what Lisbon has to offer! This was great for us as it meant we had a little bit of flexibility in the dishes we tried, based on the sorts of things we were most interested in.

As well as lots of food stops, we also got to see and learn a bit about the Barrio Alto & Chiado neighbourhoods, beginning with great views across Lisbon from Miradouro de São Pedro de Alcântara. Starting from the top of the hill means the tour is all downhill from there – perfect for a rapidly filling belly.

View From Miradouro de São Pedro de Alcântara

We don’t want to give away all of the dishes and locations on the tour but you will absolutely get to try what I rate as the BEST pasteis de nata (Portuguese egg custard tarts) I’ve ever tasted. After spending 5 months in Portugal and doing a lot of testing, I was blown away by how good these were. Suffice to say, we went back again a few days after the tour.

Expect pork & bacalhau – two of Portugal’s favourite proteins. And don’t worry about leaving hungry – you’ll be stuffed by the end of this tour!

We took “Lisbon’s Favourite Food Tour: The 10 Tastings” With Luciana @ WithLocals

Our guide Luciana was bubbly, chatty and fun, keeping us actively engaged and making us feel very welcome.

Check out all the WithLocals Lisbon Food tours

Learn More about the “Lisbon’s Favourite Food Tour: The 10 Tastings

 

 

Our Lisbon Food Podcast – COMING LATE JUNE 2019

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THE BELOW CONTENT IS A COMPANION, NOT A TRANSCRIPT, FOR THE PODCAST

Foodies Guide Lisbon

What To Eat In Lisbon: Soups, Snacks & Starters

Lisbon food to get you started. From Portuguese street food to typical Portuguese food that you just have to try in Lisbon.

Portuguese street food: Bolinhos de Bacalhau / Pasteis de Bacalhau

What To Eat In Lisbon: Pasteis de Bacalhau

What To Eat In Lisbon: Pasteis de Bacalhau

A popular Portuguese street food. Bolinhos de Bacalhau also called pasteis de Bacalhau – little cod and potato fritters, a bit like croquettes. More on why salt cod (bacalhau) is so popular in Lisbon, in the mains section below.

Bacalhau com Grao

What To Eat In Lisbon: Bacalhau com Grao (Cod & Chickpea Salad)

What To Eat In Lisbon: Bacalhau com Grao (Cod & Chickpea Salad)

Cod & chickpeas salad. A simple, cold dish for the summer. A dish you’ll get an opportunity to try on the WithLocals 10 tasting Lisbon Food Tour

Caldo Verde

Caldo Verde (Kale, Potato & chouriço soup)

Caldo Verde (Kale, Potato & chouriço soup)

Most Lisbon restaurants offer a Sopa do Dia (soup of the day). When it’s available, be sure to try Caldo Verde, a warm green soup made with simple ingredients like potatoes, kale, olive oil and salt. It was voted one of Portugal’s 7 gastronomic wonders by locals in 2011.

Octopus Salad

Octopus is another part of the extensive seafood variety that you’ll find with typical Portuguese food.

Quejio (Cheese) – Specifically Queijo de Azeitão

Typical Portuguese Food: Quejio (Cheese)

Typical Portuguese Food: Quejio (Cheese)

Portugal is definitely a cheese nation. You’ll find many unique types of Queijo but one of the most important to try is Queijo de Azeitão.

This unpasteurised sheep cheese has been awarded a PDO protected origin status and is produced in the town of Azeitão about 40KM east of Lisbon.

This is a hard rind cheese, you don’t eat the rind and instead, slice off the top and then spoon out the thick, creamy insides – preferably with a glass of Portuguese red wine.

Interestingly, the Azeitao cheese is vegetarian friendly as they use a special local thistle flower, rather than animal rennet, to separate the milk. This also contributes a slight herbal flavour.

Portuguese Street Food: Tostas

Lisbon Food | Typical Portuguese Food: Tostas

Typical Portuguese Food: Tostas

The humble toastie is available at almost every kiosk, pasteleria (pastry/bakery shop) and cafe in Lisbon. Upgrade to rustic Portuguese bread, rather than regular sliced bread, for a more delicious experience. Ham and cheese, or just cheese. It’s all good.

Petiscos – It’s not tapas

(Anchovas) Pickled Anchovies. One of many Petiscos

Tapas is Spanish. The tapas tradition started as a small snack that was brought with a drink and was used to cover the drink to stop dust and insects getting in. The word tapas comes from the word tapar mean “to cover”. But petiscos, while slightly similar to tapas in their portion size, were designed to just be small portions of bigger dishes. A lot of the dishes on this guide could also be served as petiscos.

What To Eat In Lisbon: Mains & Seafood

Portugal is famed for its seafood but you’ll also find excellent pork. What Lisbon Food are the locals eating? Here are some of the top main courses.

Bifana, Prego, Leitão (Meat Sandwiches)

Lisbon Food: Bifana Grelhado (Grilled Pork Sandwich)

Lisbon Food: Bifana Grelhado (Grilled Pork Sandwich)

The mainland animal protein in Portugal is Pork. The climate and landscape lend itself better to rearing pork than to beef, though beef is also popular.

Bifana is a simple fast food favourite – A Portuguese pork sandwich. Its cousin Prego, is the beef equivalent, and they also have Leitão, a pulled pork sandwich. They’re great as a cheap lunch, or late night snack, you can often grab one for a couple of Euros at sandwich shops, ideal Portuguese street food. But you’ll also find them in many Lisbon restaurants where locals eat and more touristy places too.

Recipes and styles of bifana differ a little, but the general principle is that thinly cut pork steaks are simmered in a white wine stock with garlic & olive oil, normally paprika, bay leaf, vinegar and sometimes piri-piri. You’ll see them simmering in the windows of snack bars around Lisbon and beyond.
Normally the meat is pulled straight from the big bubbling pot of sauce and all those juices soak into the bread roll with a soft inside to capture every drop. Then a firm outside to stop the bread falling apart.

It’s a salty meat bomb waiting to explode in your mouth!

Sometimes a whole pork cutlet is used, rather than thin slices.

The bifana grelhada is a grilled pork sandwich, rather than stewed. Though the name may be used interchangeably, so if you can’t see the pork bubbling away, ask how the pork is cooked before ordering.

The Bifana is so popular that McDonald’s released a McBifana – we are certainly not recommending McDonald’s as your ideal Lisbon food culture experience, just saying they jumped on the Portuguese pork sandwich bandwagon for a reason… It’s that popular.

The essential final ingredient is some cheap squirty yellow mustard, like you’d have on a hotdog, and optionally, some piri piri sauce for a bit of kick.

It’s worth noting that bifana styles vary across the country. In Lisbon and the south, the meat is pulled from the sauce. In Porto and the north, you often get a lot more sauce served onto the sandwich, for extra juicy mess.

The Bifana was invented in Vendas Novas, a small town in the Alentejo region – just 30KM east of Lisbon. We didn’t make it there but apparently most of the old places selling Bifana claim to have invented it. No one really knows which one did.

To try tasty bifana in Lisbon, check out a Parreirinha do Chile – though you will find Bifana everywhere!

Bacalhau (Salt Cod)

Typical Portuguese Food: Bacalhau

Typical Portuguese Food: Bacalhau (Salt Cod)

Bacalhau is salted dried codfish. It’s a lot more than one dish. Locals claim it’s at least 365 dishes – one for each day of the year – which make use of Portugal’s most popular ingredient bacalhau. If you want fresh cod it is usually referred to as bacalhau fresco.

In reality, there may be way more than 365 cod dishes popular in Portugal, some say close to 1000, but we didn’t have time to find them all!

So let’s talk a little bit about why Cod, a type of fish that does not swim in the waters around Portugal at all, has become Portugal’s national dish.

In the 16th century, after the discovery of the Americas, Portuguese fishermen headed on long voyages in search of new fishing grounds. The first and most important region they exploited was off the coast of Newfoundland.

This was actually British territory, but as the Portuguese were allied with the British, they traded salt with the British – which was abundant in Portugal – in return for the right to fish in the region and for military protection.

With no refrigeration in those days, the only way to collect large amounts of fish and then transport it all the way back across the Atlantic was to preserve it by drying and salting. Certain types of fish lend themselves better to the salt preservation process than others – specifically fish where the flesh is less oily. This is why cod was the perfect fit for this.

The long shelf life and rich fishing ground led to bacalhau becoming a popular staple for both rich and poor in Portugal by the 18th century. It is a common part of dishes at Easter and Christmas and it’s possible that its connection to religious holidays, where land meat could not be eaten due to religious restrictions, also helped extend its presence in Portuguese cuisine.

Over time, political situations changed, as did refrigeration. Portuguese fishing in Newfoundland declined, much of the cod was being supplied to Portugal by British fleets instead and by the early 20th century, most cod was coming from waters around Iceland and Norway instead.

With meat and fresh fish being expensive at the time, poorer people relied on affordable salt cod. But importation raised the price. So after the Portuguese military dictatorship began in 1926, the government went on a mission to rebuild fishing fleets and increase production. They fixed cod prices and built a workforce, who suffered bad conditions in order to keep prices down.

The fishing process was a harsh form of labour. Individual fishermen would launch off the main ships and spend 8 or more hours collecting fish from a tiny boat before being collected and then beginning the work of processing the fish on board.

The death knell for this harsh industry was the fall of the dictatorship in 1974. Fishermen were freed from coerced labour, and supply returned to importation. Prices increased and every Cod had to go further on the table. Today, bacalhau is still massively popular and you can smell it as you walk into most supermarkets, stacked up in big piles.

So, if you are in Lisbon, how should you eat bacalhau?

Bacalhau a Bras

Lisbon Food: Bacalhau a Bras

Lisbon Food: Bacalhau a Bras

One of the most popular styles in Lisbon is Bacalhau a Bras – after rehydration, the cod is shredded and mixed with egg, finely chopped onion and crispy little fried matchstick potatoes, then baked and served with parsley and black olives. The name “a Bras” is said to refer to the name of the creator of the dish, which likely was first served in the Barrio Alto district of Lisbon, now a nightlife hub.

For a naughty treat, try Bacalhau com natas – Cod & fried potatoes baked in a cream sauce until golden.

Also, Bacalhau à Lagareiro, Cod baked confit style in olive oil with potatoes and onions.

Mentioned in the starters/snacks section above Bolinhos de BacalhauBacalhau com Grao. And, at least 360 other preparations of the bacalhau to discover!

Cozido

A stew considered by many as a Portugal national dish is “cozido à portuguesa”. A stew of vegetables with various kinds of meat. The most typical kind is pork, but a mix of meats can also be used including game like rabbit. Everything is thrown in one pot and boiled. The stock is served as a soup and then the meat and veg served on a plate separately. This is a popular dish from Portugal and Spain, so who invented it? We plan to look at that more in our what to Eat in Madrid Podcast – coming August 2019.

 

Sardinhas Assadas / Grelhado (Grilled/BBQ Sardines)

Lisbon Food: Sardinhas Assadas

Lisbon Food: Sardinhas Assadas

Sardines! They may not be fancy but they are certainly a big part of the Lisbon food scene. As Lisbon sits on a wide river estuary just 20KM from the Atlantic, sardines are a local catch. They’ve formed a part of the diet at least since the Moors ran the city from the early 8th century.

Though you’ll find them year round, the best time to enjoy them is during the biggest harvest of the year, in early June. The festival of st. Anthony, the patron saint of Lisbon, marks the beginning of the harvest. The busiest part of the sardine celebration is around June 13th, where you’ll find streetside grills barbecuing these tasty fishies. Other times of the year you may be getting sardines thawed from frozen, still great but not quite as perfect.

As well as grilled sardines, tinned sardines are super popular and you’ll even find restaurants devoted to “conservas” serving different specialist tinned foods along with garnishes and drinks.

Piri Piri Chicken

Piri Piri Chicken is Spatchcocked / butterflied whole chicken grilled over hot coals. The Piri Piri refers to the hot spice rub used to get the skin crispy and delicious. With its roots possibly coming from Portuguese colonies in Africa, we’ll be looking into the full story of Piri Piri chicken in another article. But if you are in Lisbon, search out this chicken that will put Nandos to shame.

Try at Frangasqueira Nacional

Chouriço (Portuguese Chorizo)

What To Eat In Lisbon: Chouriço (Portuguese Chorizo)

What To Eat In Lisbon: Chouriço (Portuguese Chorizo)

Portuguese Chouriço is quite different from dry cured Spanish Chorizo. The meat is softer. The tradition in Portugal is to take a whole Chouriço and bring it to the table on a ceramic dish and light flames underneath it to cook it and crisp up the skin. You’ll also find Chouriço used as an ingredient in many other dishes.

Polvo à lagareiro (Baked Octopus)

A whole octopus is first boiled, then roasted with lots of olive oil and garlic. Segments are served with boiled potatoes. It’s a classic you’ll find all over Portugal.

Choco Frito (Deep Fried Cuttlefish)

Typical Portuguese Food: Choco Frito (Cuttlefish)

Typical Portuguese Food: Choco Frito (Cuttlefish)

Cuttlefish is a big step above squid in my opinion. Softer flesh. And the Portuguese seem to get it just perfect every time. A fantastic version can be found at Taberna do Relojoeiro in Almada, south of the river. Reservations advised it’s a small place.

Moelas

Speaking of Taberna do Relojoeiro, they sometimes feature a homestyle Portuguese favourite: Moleas. Chicken gizzards. This may not sound appetizing but it’s a fantastic comfort food and if you didn’t know it was gizzards, you’d just yum it up. We actually didn’t know until we tasted it what it was as the waiter just recommended it and we went with it.

Arroz de Mariscos

A one pot rice and mixed seafood dish. Flavoured with white wine and garlic, and featuring a choice of shellfish and other seafood. The dish is believed to originate from the beach town of Vieira, 100km or so north of Lisbon, but is popular nationwide and is another of the 7 gastronomic wonders chosen by locals.

Feijoada (Pork & Beans Stew)

Typical Portuguese Food: Feijoada

Typical Portuguese Food: Feijoada

A rich and hearty beans stew containing various chunks of pork including Chouriço and blood sausage. A Portuguese dish which is also popular in Brazil.

Alheira Sausage de Mirandela

What To Eat In Lisbon: Alheira Sausage de Mirandela

What To Eat In Lisbon: Alheira Sausage de Mirandela

Another dish which is popular nationwide, this sausage comes from the far north of Portugal, from Mirandela and the surrounding area. It’s made from chicken and/or game meat mixed with bread and is typically served as a whole sausage, not as an ingredient in other dishes. It may be served with a fried egg and chips (fries).

Unlike Portugal’s typical pork sausages, the Alheira sausage was invented as a way for the Jewish population of the region to trick the Spanish Inquisition into thinking they had truly converted to Christianity. It was normal for Portuguese Catholic families to make all their pork sausages and hang them outside their homes to dry. So, Jewish households could avoid standing out by hanging their chicken sausages outside.

Lulas recheadas à lisbonense

Lisbon style stuffed squid. The squid is stuffed with sausages, garlic and onions and then baked.

Some other dishes to look out for:

Iscas com elas – Thin strips of calf’s liver sauteed in garlic and white wine. The dish was brought to Lisbon in the 19th century from Galicia in Spain.

Cataplana de mariscos – A popular seafood stew with rice which originates from the Algarve coast in the south.

Caldeirada – A slightly spiced seafood stew with piri-piri, black pepper, ginger and garlic.

Favas com Chouriço – A filling mix of fava beans cooked with Portuguese chouriço.

Torresmos – Crispy, fried pork fat. The Portuguese version of chicharron (Pork Scratchings/pork rinds).

Caracóis – Snails boiled with garlic and oregano.

Tripas – Traditional stew made with tripe, veg and white beans. The original dish likely dates back to the 14th century.

 

What To Eat In Lisbon: Desserts & Drinks

Finally, for our foodies guide Lisbon – Sweet treats and boozy beverages.

Pastéis de Nata

Lisbon Food: Pasteis de Nata (Egg Custard Tarts)

Lisbon Food: Pastéis de Nata (Egg Custard Tarts)

Egg custard tarts in crispy puff pastry. The Portuguese version of these was invented at a monastery in Belem, a suburb of Lisbon. They sold the recipe to a baker just over the street, and that original bakery now sells thousands of pastéis de nata every day – a Lisbon food icon. But, are they the best in Lisbon?

My top pick beats out the ones in Belem. Try out Mantegeria in Barrio Alto.

The fame of these little sweet treats has spread far and wide, but how did the original egg tart come to be? It’s a much more complicated story than the very brief version above. A full article and podcast on egg tarts is coming July 2019. 

Pao de Deus

What To Eat In Lisbon: Pao de Deus (Bread of God)

What To Eat In Lisbon: Pao de Deus (Bread of God)

A simple dessert/snack we fell in love with in Lisbon was Pao de Deus: The Bread Of God!

This is a brioche style bread roll with a thick, eggy, sweet coconut crust on top. It really is a bite of heaven, even for Megsy who is not a massive coconut fan.

Try Pão de Deus at A Padaria Portuguesa – a chain that you’ll find around Lisbon.

Ginjinha (Sour Cherry Liqueur)

Lisbon Drinks: Ginjinha

Lisbon Drinks: Ginjinha

Ginjinha is a liqueur made from Ginja (sour cherries) that originates from Lisbon.

The inventor of the Ginjinha was from Galicia, a region of Spain just North of Portugal. His name was Francisco Espinheira and he founded his little Ginjinha shop in 1840 and it’s still there! At least, it is the first dedicated shop known to sell the drink, it’s quite likely a similar drink has been made in Portugal since at least the 17th Century.

It’s easy to know you’re nearby A Ginjinha Espinheira as the stone tiles around the square next to this liquor shop start to get very sticky from all the little spillages of tasty liqueur.

Ginjinha is made by macerating sour cherries in brandy, the Portuguese name for these is ginja, which is where the name of the drink comes from. After maceration, the fruity brandy is then mixed with water, sugar and cinnamon. This produces a pleasing sweet and sour beverage to sip at.

You can have it served with or without a couple of whole cherries in the shot. I suggest getting them, they are booze saturated and give it more of a kick!

You can get your shot in a glass, or you can request an edible chocolate cup!

A Ginjinha Espinheira is not the only place in Lisbon to try this popular liqueur. You can even find it served by old ladies from their front room windows as you walk around the little neighbourhood of Alfama. Or you can buy a bottle in the supermarket.

Port Wine

Port wine is a sweet fortified wine (about 20% ABV) which hails from Porto but is available all over Portugal. If you won’t make it north, then try Port Wine in Lisbon.

Vinho Verde (Green Wine)

Vinho Verde translates as “green wine” but really means “young wine”. It refers to wines specifically made in and around the Minho province of North Portugal. The wine is not green, it can be red, white or rose. But these wines are drunk very young, bottled 3 to 6 months after harvest, and drunk soon after. Although this is not a Lisbon speciality, it is something you’ll find in wine shops and bars across the capital.

Beer

The most popular lager in Lisbon is Super Bock and Sagres. Sagres (my preference of the two) comes from the south and is a little maltier than Super Bock.

 

Accommodation in Lisbon:

Booking.com | Agoda | Hotels.com | Lastminute.comAirbnb (Get $25 Credit)

 

Book A Lisbon Tour:

 

 

 

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11 Best Cooking Classes In Italy

Cooking Classes In Italy, cooking schools in italy

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Wondering what are the best cooking classes in Italy? We have reached out to our favourite foodies who told us their all time favourite cooking school experiences in Italy. We cover quite a few of the most popular destinations in Italy so you can find the perfect cooking class experience in Italy to join no matter where you are on your tasty Italian vacation.

11 Best Cooking Classes In Italy, cooking schools in Italy

Disclaimer: This post may contain affiliate links which pay me a commission if you choose to purchase something. You do not pay extra using this link. Thank you for supporting this blog by purchasing through these links.

 

11 Must Do Cooking Classes In Italy – Best Cooking Schools in Italy

 

Taormina Cooking Class, Sicily

Cooking Classes In Italy - Best Cooking Schools in Italy

Cooking Classes In Italy – Best Cooking Schools in Italy

 

One Italian cooking class to try is at the Red & White Hostaria in Taormina, Sicily. This Hostaria was originally a wine bar, then the owner, Gianluca, launched his now top-rated, organic restaurant in the heart of town. 

The restaurant offers small classes, which is perfect since the kitchen is small. 

Your day starts with a typical Sicilian breakfast (bought, not made) so you can chat with Gianluca a bit. Then you head off to the local market to choose the fresh ingredients. We returned with our eggplant, fish, tomatoes, spices, and some pasta flour for our creations. 

In the kitchen with head chef, Davide, we made typical Eggplant Parmigiana and Macaroni with an eggplant sugo as starter and ‘Primo.’ I learned how to wrap the Macaroni around a wire to make the shape, which isn’t easy, and then I cleaned and prepared the baked fish. Gianluca picks the fresh fish each day at the recommendation of the fishmonger. 

All these courses are paired with amazing, regional Sicilian wines. I think I sampled five of them! I arrived at 9:30a and left at 3p, completely stuffed and with a new personalized apron. Great experience and the staff were top-notch. If you’re looking for a traditional Sicilian cooking class, this is one to try. 

Maureen – LifeOnTheMediterranean.com

 

Florence Cooking Class – Tuscany

Cooking Classes In Italy, Florence Cooking Class, Cooking Classes in Tuscany

11 Best Cooking Classes In Italy, Florence Cooking Class, Cooking Classes in Tuscany

 

One of the best cooking classes I have taken during my trips was in Florence, run by Eating Europe. During the half a day experience I have learned so much about the Italian cuisine but also about the lifestyle of Florence. We have started the tour with a visit to the market, from where we bought fresh vegetables for our pasta dishes. Then, we explored some of the local bread, cheese, and meat shops, to have a taste of the most local products.

This cooking class in Florence was held at a food studio that had a professional kitchen, in a house located in a non-touristy area of the city. It was a full hand on class, where each of the participants got to cook all of the dishes. We started with learning how to make pasta: spaghetti and ravioli. The pasta rolling machine was a lot of fun! In total, we cooked 4 different dishes: tomato bruschetta, tagliatelle al pomodoro with “Mamma’s” secret sauce recipe, spinach, and ricotta ravioli and caramel chocolate panna cota. During a well-deserved break, we enjoyed a platter of local hams and salami, washed down with a glass of homemade prosecco.

Joanna – The World In My Pocket

 

Pisa Cooking Class – Tuscany

Cooking Classes In Italy, Pisa Cooking Class, Cooking Classes in Tuscany

Cooking Classes In Italy, Pisa Cooking Class, Cooking Classes in Tuscany

 

Pizza is the greatest gift Italy has given to the world. If you happen to travel through Italy, you should definitely use the chance to learn how real Italian pizza is made. The pizza making class by Massimo on ToursByLocals will teach you all about it. And it does so in an incredible atmosphere in the countryside near the beautiful Tuscan city of Pisa.

After pickup from your hotel in Pisa, you will start with the first step of the pizza making process: the dough. You will need just the right amount of flour, water, oil, salt and yeast – and plenty of time. Later, it is time to fire up the wood oven and get the pizza ready. Fresh tomato sauce, juicy mozzarella and tasty vegetables right from the farm. A real pizza will only take a few minutes in the oven before it is ready to be enjoyed. After feasting on your own creation, you will be brought back to your hotel in Pisa. An incredible experience.

Mike – 197 TravelStamps.com

Even more tasty options….. 

 

Florence Cooking Class – Tuscany

Cooking Classes In Italy, Florence Cooking Class

Cooking Classes In Italy, Florence Cooking Class

 

Florence Italy is one of my favorite cities. During my last visit, I took the Wanna Be Italiano Cooking Class with a Central Market Tour. During the market tour, we learned what to look for when picking fresh ingredients. Back in the classroom with our groceries, we prepared Bruschetta. I was amazed by what a difference rubbing a clove of garlic on toasted bread can make. We then made hand-rolled tagliatelle pasta and ravioli with ricotta cheese and parmesan from scratch. I could not believe how simple the process was, all it takes is a little flour and an egg!

Moving on we prepared a fresh cherry tomato sauce and a meat sauce using Chianti wine. We prepared tiramisu for dessert. This actually required a little bit of work, by work I mean whisking egg whites. The class was composed of couples, solos, and groups of friends. We drank wine, chatted, laughed and had an amazing meal together. I highly recommend this experience.

Sherianne – OutOfOffice.Blog

 

Rome Cooking Class, Lazio

Cooking Classes in Italy, Rome Cooking Class

Cooking Classes in Italy, Rome Cooking Class

 

If you’re looking for the best pasta in Rome, look no further than Ristomama’s pasta-making class—a multi-hour, hands-on class that covers handmade pasta and several preparations.

When two young, entrepreneurial Italian fellows decided to start a series of cooking classes, they turned to their own favorite cooks—their mothers—and recruited them to teach small group lessons on traditional Italian cuisine in their beautiful Italian homes.

The result is spectacular. Traditional meals from all over Italy. Fresh ingredients harvested from Rafaella’s rooftop garden. Hand-rolled pastas. Kitchens full of laughter. And a perfectly poised lunch at the end of it all.

Gigi – Viciousfoodie.com

 

 

Cooking Classes in Italy, Rome Cooking Class

11 Best Cooking Classes In Italy, Rome Cooking Class

 

I took a pasta making class in Rome with Walks of Italy and loved it. The class is held in a chic roof-top apartment minutes from Piazza Navona with a terrace directly below a gorgeous church dome. We were welcomed with a glass of wine and some antipasti as we got to know our classmates. The two hosts/ teachers were a charming Italian couple with flawless English.

Everything was set up for us at a long outdoor table.  Making the dough from scratch was surprisingly easy.  We used a chitarra (named after a guitar, because it has rows of tight strings that cut the pasta into thin strips) to make spaghetti and a drinking glass to cut ravioli. The sauces were cooked by a volunteer as the rest of us watched the demonstration. They were simple, with quality fresh ingredients, and delicious.

The night we took the class, a nasty storm blew in and drove us inside. A huge dining room provided an indoor alternative to the terrace, and we were barely aware of the last-minute switch. The evening finished with a delightful dinner party with more wine and the spaghetti and ravioli we had all cooked.

At the end of the evening, we got the recipes, which I have used to make fresh pasta at home since.

James – Travel Collecting

 

Forlimpopoli Cooking Class, Emilia Romagna 

Cooking Classes In Italy - Best Cooking Schools in Italy

Cooking Classes In Italy – Best Cooking Schools in Italy

 

Casa Artusi is a museum, library, and cooking school, named after the Italian gastronome, Pellegrino Artusi. Artusi is often credited as being the father of Italian food. He created the first national cookbook. Artusi wasn’t even a chef, or a cook, just a passionate foodie; before being one became a thing. During a Casa Artusi cooking class, just an hour east of Bologna, it’s possible to learn each of the famous Emilia Romagna pasta dishes.

Cooking classes at Casa Artusi are run by the Associazione delle Mariette. The association’s goal is to teach traditional forms of cooking Italian food. The Mariette are all volunteers who are dedicated to the goals of maintaining the traditions of Italian cooking. They teach how to roll the pasta as well as how to cut it or form it into small shapes, like tiny tortellini, or rolling it into garganelli.

One thing to note, the entire pasta-making course at Casa Artusi is in Italian. But that doesn’t seem to be a problem. Each Mariette will demonstrate the different pastas and help students along. They can arrange English-language classes for groups, on request. But, there is something just a little bit fun about taking a cooking class entirely in Italian.

Amber – Food & Drink Destinations

 

⇒ Looking for more to do in the Emilia Romagna Region? Check out our Day Trips From Bologna Post

 

Naples Cooking Class, Campania

naples italy cooking class, cooking classes in italy

Naples Italy cooking class, cooking classes in Italy

 

Napoli is the birthplace of pizza and the perfect destination to hone your pizza making skills. On a trip to find themust eat foods in Italy, learning to make pizza with Toffini Academy was an absolute highlight. We started by learning the history of pizza and then went onto make 3 different pizza dishes; pizza, pizza fritta and montanara. For those not familiar with the latter two (I wasn’t), they are both variations of pizza that are fried but using the same delicious ingredients. After learning to make each dish, we, of course, stopped to taste our creations. I would definitely recommend attending this class with an empty stomach, as there is plenty to eat throughout. The course is a great hands-on experience and the perfect way to immerse yourself in Neapolitan culture, and of course eat lots of delicious pizza!

Milan Cooking Class, Lombardy

Cooking Classes In Italy, Milan Cooking Class

Cooking Classes In Italy, Milan Cooking Class

 

While I was in Italy I was desperate to take a cooking class.  When I found Pietro’s pasta making cooking class in Milan on Airbnb Experiences it was the perfect chance to learn more about pasta with a local cook in his own home.  We would learn how to make (and eat!) our own homemade pasta as well as my favourite dessert – tiramisu.  Pietro was a fabulous host, friendly and fun, and his mum even came to help with the class which made it a lovely family affair. 

The food we made was incredible, ravioli with a leek and ricotta filling, and orecchiette with a simple tomato sauce.  And one of the best tiramisus I’ve ever tasted!  Pietro showed us every step in the pasta making process, from mixing the ingredients and kneading the dough, to making the orecchiette shapes with our bare hands, and rolling out the ravioli dough with his pasta maker.  I had no idea that making pasta was so simple, I can’t wait to try it again at home.  The best part was eating the ravioli, drizzled with melted butter and grated cheese, it was heavenly!  I loved this class and the food, and definitely recommend it to anyone visiting Milan.

Claire – This Travel Lover

 

San Gemini Cooking Class – Umbria

Cooking Classes In Italy, Umbria Cooking Class

Cooking Classes In Italy, Umbria Cooking Class

 

Each of Italy’s regions boast a distinctive and delicious cuisine – Umbria’s may be less well-known than some of the others, but it is well worth taking a class to explore its bold flavours while you are in the country. I took a cooking class with local chef and personality Loretta Autuori, who runs the cookery school Percosi con Gusto to delve a little deeper into Umbrian cuisine, and would highly recommend you do the same.

Umbrian cuisine is centred around local specialities such as cured sausages, truffles (the region is well-known for the quality and quantity of truffles it produces) and prosciutto. During the class, we learnt how to make gnocchi with truffles and a few antipasti to start the meal off. It was fabulous to see how such a simple dish could be elevated to absolute perfection by just paying attention to the small details.

Julianna –  The Discoveries Of

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Tommo & Megsy’s Recommendation

With so many amazing cooking classes in Italy you might be wondering what we at Food Fun Travel think is the best cooking school in Italy…..

 

Bologna Cooking Class, Emilia Romagna

Le Sfogline Cooking Class 

Cooking Classes In Italy, cooking schools in italy

Cooking Classes In Italy, cooking schools in Italy

The sisters at Le Sfogline are well known in the region – famous even. They have been making hand made pasta for the locals for the past 20+ years and have also taught some celebrities how to do it as well. People like Jamie Oliver, Nigella Lawson and more have stood in their quaint little pasta shop and learned the art of rolling pasta dough….and you can do it too!

Not only is Le Sfogline one of the best places to learn this craft, but the sisters are such incredible personalities you can’t help but have a fun time doing it too. 

They don’t accept reservations by email so you will need to call them to see if they have time to host a cooking class. But they both speak English so no need to worry there. 

Cooking Classes In Italy, cooking schools in Italy

Cooking Classes In Italy, cooking schools in Italy

These are just the tip of the iceberg for amazing cooking classes in Italy but it’s enough to get you started planning your next tasty adventure! 

Looking for more adventures during your trip to Italy? Here are a few great options: 

 

 



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Easy Lemon Ricotta Pancakes

Lemon Ricotta Pancakes

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Lemon Ricotta Pancakes are light and fluffy and full of lemon flavor. They are easy to make and come together in minutes. You can even add blueberries for a fun twist!

Lemon Ricotta pancakes may seem like a fancy recipe, but they are super simple to make. Ricotta adds a light and fluffy texture to the pancakes. The lemon juice and lemon zest give a lovely, but subtle lemon flavor. We recommend serving these with either traditional maple syrup, buttermilk syrup, or blueberry syrup.

 

Can I add blueberries to lemon ricotta pancakes?

Yes, you can easily add blueberries to this recipe! Fresh blueberries can be folded into the pancake batter, or you can add them in after you scoop the batter onto a griddle to form designs or patterns. You can also use frozen blueberries, but be sure to defrost them completely and remove any excess moisture. Use up to 1 cup of either fresh or frozen blueberries in this recipe.

 

How do I know when to flip my pancakes?

Lemon ricotta pancakes should be cooked on a flat surface over medium high heat. To decide when to flip, look for bubbles in the batter. The edges will start lose their shine and then you’ll know it is time to flip. Your pancake should be golden brown on each side.

 

If you like this recipe, you may also be interested in these other delicious pancake recipes:

 

Watch the video below where Rachel will walk you through every step of this recipe. Sometimes it helps to have a visual, and we’ve always got you covered with our cooking show. You can find the complete collection of recipes on YouTubeFacebook Watch, or our Facebook Page, or right here on our website with their corresponding recipes.

Lemon Ricotta Pancakes

Easy Lemon Ricotta Pancakes

Lemon Ricotta Pancakes are light and fluffy and full of lemon flavor. They are easy to make and come together in minutes. You can even add blueberries for a fun twist!

Prep Time5 mins

Cook Time15 mins

Total Time20 mins

Print Pin Rate

Servings: 12 pancakes

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • tablespoons  sugar
  • teaspoons  baking powder
  • teaspoon  baking soda
  • 1/2  teaspoon  salt
  • cup  milk
  • 3/4 cup ricotta cheese
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice

Instructions

  • In a large mixing bowl, sift together flour, sugar baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

  • Whisk in milk, ricotta, eggs, lemon zest, and lemon juice.

  • Preheat a flat griddle over medium-high heat.

  • Scoop 1/4 cup of pancake batter onto griddle. Let pancakes cook until bubbles form before flipping.

  • Cook other side until golden brown. Serve hot with syrup.

Course: Breakfast

Cuisine: American

Keyword: Lemon Ricotta Pancakes

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