How to Grow Radishes | Dishin & Dishes

How to Grow Radishes | Dishin & Dishes

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Radishes are one of the absolute easiest of vegetables to grow. The bonus that they come up very quickly and you harvest them after a few short weeks is instant gratification, and I promise you that you’ll love the home-grown version so much more than the store-bought. Mr. Wonderful didn’t think he liked radishes until he tried our home grown ones.





Radishes, Raphanus sativus, belong to the Brassicaceae, or mustard family. Makes sense since their peppery tops are reminiscent of mustard greens right?



If you don’t know what Brassicas are, think kale, cabbage, Brussels sprouts and broccoli.

There are all different kinds of radishes like Easter Egg, Watermelon and others, but my very favorite and the easiest to grow for me has been French Breakfast Radishes. The seeds I use are from Botanical Interests. I absolutely love their seeds and can get them locally at my favorite nursery.





The part we eat is actually grown primarily under the ground, so you’re actually eating the root of the plant.  Also, radishes are full of Vitamin C and plenty of other nutrients…so finding different ways to eat them is good for you! (See my Sauteed Radishes with Bacon recipe here.) The tops are actually great too – shred them into salads for a added peppery zip, or saute them like any other green like kale or spinach.

Now, onto growing radishes!

Radishes usually prefer cool weather, although there are summer varieties. I’ve never ventured into those due to our extreme heat here in Oklahoma, but if you live in a cooler climate, you can try French Breakfast, the cool looking white Icicle or the Scarlet King.

Wait until all danger of frost is over in your area, although I’ve had these things live through one! Make sure you plant in an area that gets at least 5-6 hours of sunlight per day.

Till your ground up so it’s not all compact. Radishes prefer cool and loose soil.  I take the back of my garden trowel and poke a very shallow hole, about 1/2 inch deep and about 1 inch apart. You can plant A LOT of radishes if you take some time and drop a seed or two in each hole instead of just sprinkling them in a line. I like to sow a different line each weekend throughout spring and fall so that I don’t have 9 million coming to harvest all at once. It literally takes 2 minutes to plant a row.

Water them every few days as the quick-growing roots of the radish require plenty of water to keep them going. You won’t believe how quick they pop up-  their tiny green leaves sprout above the ground sometimes in as little as 2-3 days, but may take up to a week.

You’ll know they’re ready to harvest when the “shoulders” of them poke up above the ground about 1/2 inch.





If you wash them before you store them, make sure to thoroughly dry them to avoid them rotting in the refrigerator.

Try slicing them into salads or onto sandwiches. Butter some crusty bread and top with slices and a sprinkle of coarse salt. Try them sliced into matchsticks in one of my Poke Bowl Recipes or in a Vermicelli Bowl.

Let me know if you have a great radish recipe…I’d love to hear more things to do with them!





 

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Sautéed Radishes with Bacon | Dishin & Dishes

Sautéed Radishes with Bacon | Dishin & Dishes

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I cannot tell you how wonderful it is to have gardening season up and running! This sautéed radish recipe is just one of the new and exciting starts of spring!

 

It was only a few weeks ago that we sprinkled radish seeds into the small raised bed in our garden. It was only days until they ambitiously popped up, their tiny first two leaves reaching up through the newly warmed soil for the sun.







Tomorrow’s post will be for showing you just how easy it is to grow radishes. It’s a great thing to start with if you’re just starting gardening. There’s still some time to plant them before the heat of summer hits.

In a matter of a few short weeks we were pulling them like crazy as radishes tend to get woody and fibrous in the middle if you let them grow too long.

Instead of just slicing them into salads, we tried a new recipe for sauteing them with some bacon and garlic. It is surprising how cooking them mellows out their bite. Added bonus if you finely shred the tops and stir them in for some green super food power as well!

Sautéed Radishes with Bacon

 

  • 2 slices bacon
  • ¾ pound radishes (i love French Breakfast)
  • ½ c. chopped yellow onion
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 T. butter
  • 1 t. fresh thyme
  • 1 T. red wine vinegar
  • 1 t. brown sugar
  • sprinkle of salt and pepper
  • Optional -reserved tops of radishes, finely shredded
  1. Chop bacon into ½ inch pieces
  2. saute in a skillet over medium heat until crispy, about 5 minutes
  3. remove bacon to a paper towel lined plate
  4. If radishes are large, slice in half, leave others small. You’re looking for uniform size in all so they cook evenly.
  5. Chop onion and add onion and radishes to skillet and let cook, without stirring 2-3 minutes (some browning is good!)
  6. Continue to stir then let brown about 8-10 minutes.
  7. Add garlic and saute 1 minute
  8. Add in vinegar and brown sugar and stir 2-3 minutes longer.
  9. Add salt, pepper and thyme, stirring well. Serve warm
  10. Optional: Stir in the shredded tops with about 5 minutes left to cook for some added green in your diet!

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roasted radish recipe








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