History Of Feta Cheese (Greek) vs Bulgarian Cheese (Sirene)

History Of Feta Cheese (Greek) vs Bulgarian Cheese (Sirene)

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In This Article, A History Of Feta Cheese (Greek) vs Bulgarian Cheese (Sirene) and other white brined cheeses of the Balkans and Middle East.

Feta cheese is the most famous variety of white brined cheese in the world. However, very similar cheeses have been made around the Balkan region, eastern Mediterranean, middle east and beyond, probably since at least 8000 BC.

In this article & podcast episode we explore the history of white brined cheese as well as the controversial decision by the EU in 2002 that Feta cheese is a 100% Greek product and that the name “Feta” can only be used on the cheese if it is made in certain parts of Greece.

 

Podcast: History Of Feta Cheese (Greek) vs Bulgarian Cheese (Sirene)

Episode Release Date is 29th May 2019 – Coming Soon!

In this episode:

  • History of Greek Feta Cheese vs. Bulgarian Sirene Cheese vs Romanian Telmea and other white cheeses. Which was the original brined white cheese?
  • We discuss the ancient history of Feta style cheese from the balkan region.
  • Should the EU have made Feta cheese a Greek only designated origin product?
  • We explain the origin of the name “Feta”.
  • Plus, How Canada may have got it right when it comes to Feta cheese…

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The Below Is A Partial, Incomplete Transcript From The Full Podcast Episode

 

The Controversy – Introducing the topic

When we visited Bulgaria locals told us that Bulgarian Cheese (Sirene) was the best Feta cheese – that it was better in flavor and perhaps even that Bulgaria had been producing it for longer.

In popular culture, mainly as an easy way to communicate an idea, we’ve found the word feta used to describe brined white cheese, which is similar to Feta, in many countries. Romanian Feta – called Telmea. Bulgarian Feta – The Sirene cheese.

But, since EU regulations enacted a DOP/PDO status to protect Feta Cheese in 2002, only brined white cheese made to strict guidelines, and made in specific regions of Greece, is allowed to be called Feta Cheese.

WHAT IS FETA / SIRENE (Bulgarian Cheese)?

Feta

Most listeners will have tried feta already. its a brined curd white cheese made from sheep’s milk or from a mixture of sheep and goat’s milk. It is a crumbly aged cheese, normally at least 3 months aged, commonly produced in blocks, and has a slightly grainy texture with a salty hit.

The October 2002 European Union bill limits the term feta to mean a brined cheese mad only from sheep’s milk or a mix of sheep and goat’s milk, with a max 30% of goat’s milk. Feta must be made in certain regions of Greece, specifically: Peloponnese, Epirus, Thessaly, Central Greece, Macedonia, Thrace, plus the islands of Lesvos and Cephalonia.

The biodiversity of the land coupled with the special breeds of sheep and goats used for milk is what gives feta cheese a specific aroma and flavor. Which is one of many reasons we’ll discuss why The name feta has become a protected origin product.

It should be noted that, at time of recording, the USA has not accepted this protected status and feta cheese purchased in the USA may not have been produced in Greece. Though talks are underway on a massive trade deal between the EU and USA that would potentially change this.

Sirene (Bulgarian Cheese)

Bulgarian Cheese on The Shopska Salad

Bulgarian Cheese on The Shopska Salad

Sirene Bulgarian Cheese can be made from a combination of goat, cow and sheep milk. There is no regulation on which, or the proportions. It’s is a little softer and wetter than feta cheese, but still crumbly and has a fat content of around 44-48%. It has a grain texture and slightly lemony flavor. I find it just a little creamier than feta, normally.

Bulgarian cheese is used for so many culinary applications, from salads to baked goods (like the Banitsa pastry), also in dips or added to other dishes. It may also be served as a table cheese.

Other White Cheese

White Cheese In Montenegro

White Cheese In Montenegro

In Romania, the equivalent cheese is called “Telmea”

Each brined white cheese from the Balkans and middle east are distinctly different but are made in a very similar way. The proportion and type of milk, the breed of animal the milk comes from, as well as the climate affect the final product.

In Lebanon, as well as having imported Greek Feta cheese, they also have Bulghari – which is a separate product that mimics the free use of milk that Sirene does – mixing in cow’s milk as well. So it’s also important to remember that our narrow English culture view of cheese history is not the only way of looking at this. Other cultures are very aware of the difference between white cheeses across the region.

It’s fair to say these cheeses all taste different, though similar. It’s like comparing Grana Padano to Parmigiano Reggiano cheese – similar style, but different taste. I can say with certainty that the “Salad Cheese” we get at our current local supermarket in portugal is absolutely inferior to the certified Feta from the same store. Of course, differences can also be down to production style and quality, so our personal test is just that – not of any scientific rigour.

I have to say I loved almost all the good quality Bulgarian Sirene cheese. And Good feta is great too. It’s hard to say one is better than the other when it depends on individual batches and production.

History of Feta Cheese & White Cheese In General

Though food historians don’t know the exact origin of white cheese, it’s believed that cheese making existed since at least 8000 BC and could have started very close to original domestication of livestock – so possibly even as far back as 10,000 BC.

The oldest reference to White brined cheese is said to be from famous greek writer Homer’s Oddyssey, from 800BC. And I quote:

“We entered the cave, but he wasn’t there, only his plump sheep grazed in the meadow. The woven baskets were full of cheese, the folds were full of sheep and goats and all his pots, tubs and churns where he drew the milk, were full of whey. When half of the snow-white milk curdled he collected it, put it in the woven baskets, and kept the other half in a tub to drink,” Homer wrote.

Homer’s fiction suggests The Cyclops Polyphemus knew how to make Feta cheese – though it wasn’t called that at the time. The fictional description shows that Homer, and hence the people of Greece in general, were very familiar with the cheese making process and specifically white cheeses.

The ancient Greeks called the product which came from the coagulation of milk “τυρí,” (Tyri).

The name Feta translates as “slice” and began being used to describe the white cheese from the 17th century onwards, probably because of the way the cheese was sliced in barrels.

However, the word fetta – with two t’s – is the Italian word for slice, and etymologists confirm the word derives from the Italian and Latin before that, not from Greek.

The name Feta prevailed in the 19th century as the main term for the cheese in Greece.

Mass immigration from Greece in the 20th century to countries like Australia, USA, Canada and Germany helped spread Feta cheese and its production around the world and boosted its international profile.

At the same time, other cultures from around the region continued to make their own white cheese to their only local preferences, as they had done for thousands of years. Most have their own local names, but Feta became the generic term, especially in English, that was used to understand this general type of cheese as well as versions of it that were by the mid 20th century being made all over the world.

From Denmark, to the UK and USA, types of feta were being produced and marketed under that name. In Denmark specifically, their Feta was focused on Cows milk, quite different from the Sheep and goat milk feta of Greece.

In the 1990’s, Greece petitioned the EU to protect the origin of Feta by giving them a geographic designation and banning other cheesemakers from marketing under the name Feta. This bill was passed in 2002.

The History Of Feta Debate

So, the debate is, with so many white cheeses from the region and eventually worldwide, had Feta become a generic name by 2002? Or is it a Greek specific name that should be protected? Did they have a strong enough claim to justify this change – and is Feta really “Greek” when the origins of white brined cheese are so lost to history?

The first question to ask – If we are pinning the origin of the Cheese on greek mythology, rather than historic record, should we be also considering what was Greece in 800 BC when Homer’s book was written?

Looking at an historical map, you’ll find Greek settlements all the way up the Black sea coast through modern day Bulgaria and into Romania and beyond. It’s possible to consider this cheese was being made by locals in this region and the knowledge was passed on to Greek traders, prior to 800 BC.

Though given the belief in the food science history community that cheese was made since at least 8000 BC, that was long before there was any such country as Greece. It just so happens that Greece has existed in some sort of perpetuity of identity for longer than most of it’s neighbours. Giving it a longer historical claim than others simply for political identity, rather than any modern day geographical origin.

Something else to note, Cyclops Polyphemus from Homer’s story is said to have lived on the Island of Sicily – Yes, Sicily of Italian Mafia fame. In 800BC this was mainly a phoenician island, Greeks started to occupy it around 750BC. So a Greek presence may have been there in 800BC, but it wasn’t really a Greek island at the time. So the earliest reference to the cheese is not particularly anything to do with Greek culture, geographically.

If you turn up and find someone doing something, then claim it as your own, did you invent it? No. But the suggestion is that the Greek visitors to the Cyclops were well aware of cheese and cheese making when they arrived, hence why they could instantly recognise the process. The Greek sailors were completely familiar with cheese making. Even though it is also suggested elsewhere that the Cyclops had accidentally discovered the cheese making process.

So, none of this really settles a geographical origin, if anything it gives weight to the idea that this style of cheese is so pervasive in the region, perhaps even that a lone cyclops could discover it independently, that Greece’s claim on the name should not be geographical or a matter of ancient indeterminable history.

Secondly, It was also argued that the word Feta was Italian in origin. So, it could hardly be claimed that it was a Greek word and hence was a generic term. A bit of a flimsy argument in my opinion. As English is made up from many words that come from Latin, this line of argument leads us down a path that pretty much anything named in English using words derived from other languages, hundreds of years ago, would then have no right to be claimed as English.

Finally, the other most important consideration, in my opinion, is that of cultural identity and association.

Almost all Western European and international producers were using Greek iconography and colors to market their Feta cheese. Greek migration was also a major reason for the spread of Feta cheese to new world countries. Culturally, the use of the word Feta was tied to the use of Greece as it’s home. When it comes to other white cheeses like Bulgarian Sirene, the name is not even a fraction as successful.

Though some may use the phrase Bulgaria Feta for convenience, there is no specific cultural connection with the word Feta and with Bulgarian cheese. It’s been called sirene for a long time and Bulgarians, proud of their heritage, don’t seem to claim at all that it is anything but Sirene – only that it is better and perhaps been around longer in Bulgaria – though Bulgaria didn’t exist as a country until the 7th century AD, so it would have been non-Bulgarians living their who were making the cheese.

For the name, the biggest controversy was actually stirred up by western European companies, like Arla, A massive Danish Dairy corporation, who feared losing a lot of money if their Danish Feta lost the word feta from their marketing.

THE CONCLUSION

A war over marketing, origin and DOP status. The argument ended up being largely about commerce, rather than about heritage. Greece’s feta exports rose 85 percent between 2007 and 2014 – is this because consumers wanted the real thing? Or that consumers are just more aware of the product today? It’s great news for Greece either way.

Greece has the oldest written evidence of the knowledge of this cheese being made though it is widely agreed the exact origin of the cheese is lost to history long before any written record was made.

Greece also named and popularised Feta, to a point where culturally, even if the origin of the word is Italian, whenever we talk about Feta cheese, the association is first and foremost to Greece – to the point where even some locals in Bulgaria / Romania etc. Use terms like “Bulgarian Feta” to help identify their cheese to foreigners – even though they can’t print that on the label. In the United States, where name regulations do not apply, it’s often sold under the name “Bulgarian Feta.”

The job for Sirene cheese, may now be to create a name for themselves, as they have a fantastic product. Rather than leapfrogging off the success of Feta – easier said than done of course.

Although the word Feta cannot be used for non Greek cheese in the EU. Other countries did not fall under that jurisdiction. but In 2013, an agreement was reached with Canada in which feta made in Canada would be called “Feta style/type cheese” cheese, and would not depict on the label anything evoking Greece. I see this as a more sensible way of approaching the issue.

With some other protected products, like Balsamic Vinegar, the name can still be used for similar products, but to know it is of authentic origin from Emilia Romagna in Italy, it has the additional DOP or IGP on the label. The generic name lets the consumer instantly recognize the type of product by a familiar name, and the additional labelling terms inform if the product is a generic, or authentic product.

I think Canada has it right on this one. The name has become a useful generic term, just like “Cheddar cheese” and the historical origin is a little vague – more so than that of cheddar which we’ll do an episode on one day, but if you use images of Greece to promote a feta cheese made in the USA or Denmark, that seems misleading.

The cultural claim to Feta seems firmly Greek, but the word itself and the history of White Brined cheese make it harder to put all the eggs in Greece’s basket.



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21 Unmissable Dishes + Victoria House Belize Reviews

Rice & Beans With Chicken Stew

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What is Belize food? It’s not exactly famous around the world. So what should you eat when you visit San Pedro Belize?

From a calorific breakfast food you are going to love to fresh lobster & boozy cake. Below are our 21 Top Picks of the best Belize food to eat and drink in San Pedro!

Updated April 2019

What to expect from Belize Food in San Pedro Belize?

San Pedro has become incredibly international. Unlike rural areas of Belize where you may end up mostly on a bean, rice and stew diet, San Pedro offers up many world class dining option.

In this article, we’ll focus on a mix of the most traditional Belizean dishes as well as the way Belize has shaped some other cuisine’s and made them their own.

A quick summary of Belizean Cuisine

Belizean cuisine is a mixture of many influences. Primarily Mayan, Mexican and Afro-Caribbean. But also English & Spanish.

Expect to find tacos next to curries and stews on a typical menu.

Belize is the only country in Latin America whose first language is English. And some remnants of English food culture still exist in Belizean cuisines – such as meat pies and Worcester sauce.

San Pedro Belize Seafood

As we are talking about what to eat in San Pedro in this article, being surrounded by both a lagoon on one side and a rich coral reef on the other side, expect restaurants in San Pedro to feature a lot of fresh seafood.

From tropical fish to giant shrimp and Lobster (seasonal). Seafood is present on almost every menu.

Belize National Dish: Rice & Beans

Rice & Beans With Chicken Stew

Rice & Beans is not originally from Belize but has become their national dish and is a must eat for any foodie visitor.

Originally a Creole dish but today it’s a staple food of Belizean cuisine and something that will be served with most meals.

In Belize and many other countries there is a big difference between Rice and Beans and Beans and Rice…

At a minimum, the dish of rice and beans in Belize always includes white long-grained rice and red kidney beans, with coconut milk, sage and other spices, ideally it’s a somewhat dry mixture where the individual grains of rice and beans are not stuck together. The beans are cooked separately until soft, and then the rice is added, along with the coconut milk to absorb the bean juice as it cooks.

Belizeans expect that rice and beans will come with three other elements: (1) some kind of stewed meat, (2) a scoop of potato salad, and (3) one or more strips of fried ripe plantain. Often you;ll find that the stewed meat stewed meat is chicken. And it’s good to note that If the host or server doesn’t mention what the meat will be, assume you’re getting chicken. But they do also serve rice and beans with pork, beef or seafood stews.

With Beans and Rice the beans are slowly stewed with onions, garlic, and a touch of recado and coconut oil, until they create a saucy consistency. The rice is cooked separately and the beans are ladled on top or served to the side. Essentially, Rice and Beans is a lot of rice with some beans mixed in. Whereas Beans and Rice is a bean stew served with plain rice.

* DISCLOSURE: Some of the links in this article are affiliate links. They generate commissions for us if you make a purchase after clicking – the final price you pay is not increased due to this, some of our links even offer discounts. This helps fund our blog and allows us the time and freedom to create guides like this one to give you a better vacation. Please support us by using our links. 

Belize Food Podcast

In This Episode:

  • We discuss the most important cultural dishes in Belize.
  • We ask “Beans And Rice” or “Rice And Beans”?
  • Rock Lobster!
  • We discover the unhealthiest, yet tastiest breakfast food in the world.
  • Plus, The Royal Rat. Is Belize’s famous rodent fit for a queen?

Listen to previous episodes using the links below:
 

Listen & Subscribe: iTunes | Spotify | Podbean | Google Play | Stitcher

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Support: Become a Patron | Tweet: @foodfuntravel | Email: [email protected]

THE BELOW ARTICLE IS A DETAILED COMPANION, NOT A TRANSCRIPT TO THIS PODCAST

Belize Food: 21 Unmissable Dishes To Try In San Pedro Belize Restaurants

NOTE: This is a list of unmissable foods that are popular (and delicious!) in San Pedro Belize. Things you should eat when you visit.

Although many of these dishes are traditional or have traditional elements, this is not solely a list of “mama’s cooking”. Some of these dishes are more international but make use of the local ingredients and cooking styles.

Are they all strictly speaking “Belize food”? No, some have a tenuous connection, but all are must-trys for any trip to San Pedro.

Belize Food: Dinner

Conch Fritters – Palmilla Restaurant (@ Victoria House Belize)

Belize Food: Conch Fritters - Palmilla Restaurant @ Victoria House belize reviews

Belize Food: Conch Fritters – Palmilla Restaurant @ Victoria House Belize

Conch is a marine mollusk. They are all over the ocean floor of the shallow waters surrounding San Pedro Belize. They are larger than you may expect – so discard any images of eating little escargot.

When served fresh, as is easy to achieve when the beach is just meters away, they have a semi-firm texture with a slight chewiness and should not taste “fishy” at all. Somewhat like calamari, but they really have a flavor and texture all their own.

Pictured above – Conch is diced and turned into fritters. The light but acidic pineapple salsa and fruity ginger dipping sauce compliment the salty conch.

 

Tequila Flamed Shrimp Stack – Palmilla Restaurant (@ Victoria House Belize)

My favorite appetizer from our trip. This shrimp stack was made from layers of red masa cake (made with corn flour) with layers of succulent giant shrimp in-between with mashed avocado and a black bean and pineapple relish.

Belize Food: Tequila Shrimp Stack - Palmilla Restaurant @ Victoria House belize reviews

Belize Food: Tequila Flamed Shrimp Stack – Palmilla Restaurant @ Victoria House Belize

What made this dish really stand out, other than the fantastic combination of shrimp and the relish, was the masa cake. The photo might make these look dense. But actually, they were light and crispy but soft on the inside.

What could have been a dense and stodgy affair was instead extremely well executed. I want these again!

Shrimp Coconut Curry – El Fogon’s

Belize Food: Shrimp Curry @ El Fogons San Pedro Belize

Belize Food: Shrimp Curry @ El Fogons

We tried a few curries while in San Pedro Belize. El Fogon’s Shrimp Coconut Curry came out at number one for a very good reason. Most curries seemed to arrive in two variants – a white sauce, clearly heavy on the coconut and with little other spice. Or a yellow sauce, heavy on the turmeric and more Afro-Caribbean spices, and low on the coconut.

El Fogon provided something outstanding. A dark curry filled with spices and moderate heat, but with a strong undertone of coconut. It was the best of both worlds, a perfect fusion.

 

Cashew Crusted Grouper – Palmilla Restaurant (@ Victoria House Belize)

The abundant fishing around San Pedro gives this international dish an opportunity to shine. This happened to be one of my favorite dishes from our entire trip.

Belize Food: Cashew Crusted Grouper - Palmilla Restaurant @ Victoria House Belize

Belize Food: Cashew Crusted Grouper – Palmilla Restaurant @ Victoria House Belize

The crispy cashew crust was perfectly seasoned and seared. Combined with citrus the balance of sweetness and texture from the cashews, along with the sourness and salt took the tender white fish within to a whole another level.

Perfectly cooked and perfectly fresh grouper filet was the star hidden beneath the moor-ish crust.

Papusas – Waruguma

Belize Food: Cheese Papusas @ Waraguma’s

Originally from El Salvador. Papusas are a thick and dense flat bread made from corn flour. They are stuffed with a number of different things. We opted for having them stuffed with cheese! But meat, beans, vegetables or a mix, are also common.

Waraguma in San Pedro Belize is the late evening spot for this post bar snack (which turns into a full meal pretty quickly if you order a few!)

 

Octopus Tostada – Palmilla Restaurant (@ Victoria House Belize)

Belize Food: Octopus Tostada - Palmilla Restaurant @ Victoria House Belize

Belize Food: Octopus Tostada – Palmilla Restaurant @ Victoria House Belize

Mexican Cuisine is a major influence within Belize food options. A crispy corn tortilla is the base of every tostada dish in this region. This octopus tostada combines the soft and delicate octopus with a Veracruzano sauce made with tomatoes and capers.

Gibnut (Seasonal)

Gibnut is a nocturnal rodent that lives in forested areas of Belize. It’s known as the Royal rat since Queen Elizabeth II of England was served one during her 1985 visit to Belize.

It’s a gamey meat that is said to have some similarity to rabbit. During our visit, we were told it was not in season. Visit from December 1st to May 1st for a better chance of trying this unusual food!

 

Belize Food: Lunch

Lunch seems to be the best time to find the more traditional Belize Food options.

Belizean Ceviche

Ceviche is raw seafood cooked without heat using fresh lime juice. Ceviche is incredibly popular throughout Latin America. Each region seems to have its own twist. You can find ceviche for both lunch & dinner in many San Pedro restaurants.

Belize Food: Belizean Ceviche @ Red Ginger San Pedro Belize restaurants ambergris caye

Belizean Ceviche @ Red Ginger (restaurants Ambergris Caye)

In San Pedro, the main difference seems to be that they add carrot to the ceviche mix. In neighboring parts of Mexico, like Merida & The Yucatan you mainly find tomato and onion to be mixed in.

The carrot adds a sweetness to the dish. I personally find this inhibiting to the overall flavor profile. But doubtless, Belizean ceviche is an important specialty you should try for yourself.

Stew With Rice & Beans And Fried Plantains

Rice & beans, and fried plantains (large bananas). That’s the staple budget meal throughout most of central America.

Belize Food: Chicken Stew @ Elvi's Kitchen San Pedro Belize restaurants ambergris caye

Belize Food: Chicken Stew With Rice & Beans @ Elvi’s Kitchen (restaurants Ambergris Caye)

The rice in Belize is typically cooked with coconut milk which gives it a rich flavor you can’t stop eating.

In San Pedro Belize, it’s normal to have a meat stew with your rice and beans. Chicken, pork or beef are most common. Stews are simple, and everyone has their own recipe. But the primary ingredient of most is “achiote”, a paste made from red recado chilies.

Stew done right will have that umami character, a real sense of comfort food. Normally the dish is not too spicy.

Salbutes

Salbutes are a traditional Mayan food. Mayan cuisine plays a strong part in Belizean cuisine because Belize is traditionally a Mayan land.

Belize Food: Mayan Salbutes @ Red Ginger San Pedro Belize restaurants ambergris caye

Belize Food: Mayan Salbutes @ Red Ginger (restaurants in Ambergris Caye)

Salbutes are a deep fried corn tortilla. A multitude of possible toppings are available. The most common are shredded chicken or turkey (though turkey is more likely in the Yucatan than in San Pedro). Cochinita Pibil (slow cooked pulled pork seasoned with achiote) is also a favorite topping.

Looking for more popular Yucatecan food? Discover more tasty dishes in our Ultimate Merida & Yucatan Guide

Escabeche

Belize Food: Escabeche - San Pedro Belize restaurants ambergris caye

Belize Food: Escabeche

Escabeche is a stew or soup made with vinegar as the primary ingredient. The vinegar is typically very strong and overpowering in the dish, so it is a bit of an acquired taste.

Chicken (or other meat) and onions are often the only solids in the dish.

Tacos & Burritos

Belize Food: Breakfast Burrito (Available at Lunch Too) @ Neri's Tacos, San Pedro Belize restaurants ambergris caye

Belize Food: Breakfast Burrito (Available at Lunch Too) @ Neri’s Tacos (San Pedro Belize restaurants)

These universally popular Mexican options are also widely available. The difference is the flavor of the fillings. Ground beef or chicken is most common, with the chicken filling often resembling a version of the chicken stew. We had this breakfast burrito with egg, ham, and cheese.

Lobster (& San Pedro Lobster Festivals)

Lobster season runs from June 15th to Feb 14th each year. It’s impossible to eat lobster legally outside of this season. So, if you are a lobster fanatic, you’ll want to organize your trip to coincide with the season.

At the start of the season, locals and visitors take the opportunity to celebrate freedom from lobster abstinence by holding a number of lobster festivals.

The main one in San Pedro is the aptly named San Pedro Lobster Festival. It runs for about 10 days in June just after the season starts.

Touted as being a little less touristy, the Caye Caulker Lobster Fest runs after the San Pedro Lobster Fest has ended. Around Late June, early July. You can take a quick ferry from San Pedro to Caye Caulker.

Belize Food: Breakfast

Breakfast in Belize starts around 5am – apparently because that’s when the fisherman need to eat before they go out to collect the day’s catch. Fortunately, you can still grab a bite much later on.

Be ready for some calorific breakfast delights…

Belizean Meat Pies

If you like pastry, and why wouldn’t you, then you are going to love these little bites of buttery happiness. And, that said, expect them to be mostly pie and very little meat. The meat filling seems to be mainly to offer some moisture to offset the pastry, and just a little flavor to dance on the taste buds.

Belize Food: Meat Pies @ Boogie's Belly (San Pedro Belize restaurants ambergris caye)

Belize Food: Meat Pies @ Boogie’s Belly (San Pedro Belize Restaurants)

Essentially, the local stew will be re-purposed, this time inside a pie. I’m not complaining! It’s worth ignoring your gluten intolerance to try these.

Availability is sporadic. One Deli we went to (Celi’s) has people waiting for the pies to be finished, and can then be sold out within 30 minutes on busy days. Sometime between 7am and 9am is a good bet. Otherwise, you have to go on a pie crawl around town until you find somewhere with some left.

Fry Jacks

Your life may never be the same again… And your waistline certainly won’t be.

Belize Food: Fry Jacks With Ground Beef @ Neri's Tacos (San Pedro Belize restaurants ambergris caye

Belize Food: Fry Jacks With Ground Beef @ Neri’s Tacos (San Pedro Belize restaurants)

Fry jacks are a fluffy deep fried bread that acts to wrap a variety of fillings. Once again, things like chicken from the stew, ground beef, or a breakfast favorite, scrambled egg with cheese and ham, will all find a place within this calorie laden wake-up food.

After sampling many of these, my favorite was the ground beef option at Neri’s tacos. I’m totally addicted to these.

For a lighter option (breakfast only), Palmilla Restaurant (@ Victoria House Belize) do a healthier version which doesn’t feel like you are eating grease at all – I don’t know how they did it!

Johnny Cakes

A Native American food that is very popular in Belize. The “cakes” are grilled or fried cornmeal flatbreads. Put two together and put ham and cheese in-between and you’ve got yourself a little Johnny cake sandwich.

The name Johnny cake is believed to be derived from a possible original name “Shwanee” after the Native American tribe. When you listen to the local Caribbean sounding accent in San Pedro, you can easily hear the similarity in name, but this is just a theory.

Belize Food: Desserts

Give me some sugar!

Belizean Coconut Pie

Who invented the coconut pie? Many might lay claim to it, but the exact origin seems disputed. Belizean coconut pie differs from other recipes as it’s all about the pie filling, not about the oodles of cream other coconut pies appear to feature.

Belize Food: Coconut Pie @ Elvi's Kitchen (San Pedro Belize restaurants ambergris caye

Belize Food: Coconut Pie @ Elvi’s Kitchen (Restaurants San Pedro Belize)

I’m not dissing cream! I would never dare! But, for the best coconut pie I have ever tasted, Belizean or otherwise, Elvi’s kitchen, a San Pedro institution, is delivering the goods! This dish is popular, and only available from the afternoon until stocks run out. We got a fresh slice just as it became available around 3.30pm. Time varies – welcome to Belizean time!

Belizean Chocolate

Belize Food: chocolate tour San Pedro Belize

Grinding the Cacao @ Belize Chocolate Company

Belize produces the high-quality cacao, used to produce the finest chocolate. The cacao comes from the inland jungles. In San Pedro Belize we got the opportunity to see the product being made by hand, and you can taste that locally made chocolate too.

Visit Belize Chocolate Company.

Belizean Rum Cake

As you’ll find out below, Belize has an abundance of rum. So, why not bake some in a cake?

We didn’t get to try any during our trip, but look out for this traditional boozy cake when you head to San Pedro.

San Pedro Belize Drinks

What will help quench your thirst in the tropical heat? Rum, of course!

Rum Punch with Belizean Rum

As a sugar producing country, the default spirit is, of course, rum. And lots of it. It’s the primary drink and it’s on every menu.

Catamaran Tour snorkel trip San pedro Belize Ho Chan Reeef

Drinking Rum Punch On Our Catamaran Tour With Tuff E Nuff Tours

And as with any tropical country, tropical fruits are just falling off the trees year round. So rum punch is the logical conclusion from these environmental factors.

The recipe is simple. Mix up whatever leftover fruit and juice you have into a big old liquid. Add copious amounts of rum. Optionally, add a little grenadine and a slice of lime if you want to be fancy.

It’s even more fancy when drunk on a Catamaran trip (pictured).

There are multiple rums, but the two main ones you’ll see everywhere are:

  • Caribbean Rum – Light golden brown liquid, with a picture of a bird on the front.
  • One Barrel – Darker. Picture of a barrel on the front.

According to one expert bartender, locals love the Caribbean Rum, tourists seem to prefer the One Barrel. We managed to confirm that stereotype. The one barrel is richer and fortifies your fruit juice with the taste of spiced sugar. The Caribbean rum is thinner in flavor and more “alcoholy”, it get’s lost in the juice so you can pretend you are not drinking rum at all. Why would you do that?

Belikin (Belize Beer)

Belikin is one of the only beer brands available in Belize, and of the limited alternatives, it’s probably the best beer too. It seems like a smart move to monopolize so that only poor quality beer is able to compete with your brand on a national scale.

Belizean Cuisine - Belikin Beer San Pedro Belize

Belikin Regular

Belizean Cuisine - Belikin Beer San Pedro Belize

Chocolate Stout & Belikin Premium

So, the good news is, that Belikin regular is a refreshing and slightly malty lager. It does the job! They also make a stout, and some other less available versions like a Chocolate Stout and Verano (summer) beer.

I’d put the chocolate stout at number one, but it’s a little heavy in the hot climate and rare to find. A longer list of beers is available here.

Best Hotels San Pedro Belize – Victoria House Belize Reviews

During our trip to San Pedro we were lucky enough to be staying at The Victoria House Resort & Spa Belize. Lucky because this place exemplifies the very meaning of Caribbean luxury boutique resort.

Victoria House Belize Reviews - San Pedro Resorts

Pristine Beach Frontage @ Victoria House Belize Reviews (San Pedro Resorts)

Pure white sand. Manicured and thick dark green grass, with palm trees perfectly spaced throughout the grounds. White walled buildings with azure colored tin roofs – and sun lounger cushions to match.

Victoria House San Pedro oozes tropical class. You could see yourself sharing a martini with James Bond in his smart-casual linens.

Victoria House Belize Reviews - San Pedro Resorts - Tower Suite

Our Room In The Tower Suite @ Victoria House Belize Reviews (San Pedro Resorts)

Even though our room was perfect wood chic, and sitting at the pool overlooking the beach is every bit as good as you could imagine… The number one reason for our existence is to eat, and the Victoria House Palmilla Restaurant really excelled beyond expectation.

We’ve mentioned a number of the options above which lie closer to traditional Belize Food. But the international selection will also impress.

Victoria House Belize Reviews - San Pedro Resorts - Palmilla Restaurant

International Cuisine @ Palmilla Restaurant, Victoria House Belize Reviews (San Pedro Resorts)

Currently, we are awarding the homemade jalapeño poppers as the best poppers we have ever popped, anywhere! The secret? The cream cheese is mixed with shredded chicken. Aside from adding texture, this also holds the inside mixture together – no drippy cream cheese. Just a perfectly warm and gooey interior. Yum!

Victoria House Belize Reviews - San Pedro Resorts

Around the Resort @ Victoria House Belize Reviews (San Pedro Resorts)

For beach luxury, impeccable service and a chef that will always leave you wanting more…

For prices and availability Call Toll Free: 1-800-247-5159

Or Check out independent Victoria House Belize reviews plus the latest availability & pricings:

Expedia | Booking.com | Agoda

* DISCLOSURE: Our stay & food at Victoria House Belize was provided complimentary. But our opinions are our own, which are that the food and accommodation were awesome! Our blog policy is that any business we feature has attained at least a 4 out of 5 personal, objective rating from us. If not, we decline to promote them.

 

Food Tours In San Pedro Belize

Looking for a guided foodie trip around the town of San Pedro? At the time of writing the only option is Belize Food Tours.

Transfers to San Pedro

San Pedro is an offshore peninsula, only accessible by ferry or air transfer.

Blue Hole Belize tours - Ambergris Caye excursions

Megsy With The Pilot: Tropic Air – Blue Hole Belize tours + domestic & international transfers to San Pedro Belize

Tropic Air runs direct flights from Cancun (CUN), Belize City (BZE), Guatemala City (GUA), Roatan (RTB) to San Pedro Airport (SPR). Other domestic and international routes are also available

Search Expedia For The Above Routes For Latest Prices & Availability

Tropic Air also offers scenic flights of Belize’s famous Blue Hole – Read more in our full article on fun things to do in San Pedro.

Ferry Transfer

The cheaper, slower and less scenic option is the ferry transfer. Ideal for budget travelers. Regular ferries depart from Belize City to San Pedro. There is also an international connection to Chetumal Mexico running once every second day.

See schedules & pricing on Belize Water Taxi Website.

—-

Looking for alternative accommodation? Search for more options in San Pedro Belize now:

Expedia | Booking.com | Agoda | Hotels.com

Or, Get $25 off your first stay with AirBnB using our link.

Love this post? Why not pin it on your favorite Travel/Foodie Pinterest Board

We’ve been to 85+ countries.

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Traditional Balinese Food + Best Bali Restaurants

Bali Food Guide

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Bali Food Guide: Learn what to eat in Bali with our traditional Balinese food guide as well where to eat in Bali with our sourced list of the best restaurants in Bali from top food/travel bloggers and local Indonesian celebrities. 

As professional foodies, we like to get in with the locals and find the absolute BEST places to eat while in a destination. Having good food can make or break your vacation, and if it’s your first time in Bali we want you our readers to actually get out and experience the best restaurants in Bali – not just eat hotel buffet meals 3 times a day.

I (Megsy) went on a trip to Indonesia as a guest of the tourism board and made sure to get the insider information to the hottest places around Bali that the locals like to eat at – Some top picks for Kuta restaurants as well the best Bali restaurants from elsewhere on the island. I also decided to open it up to some of our favourite food and travel bloggers to see what places get them drooling when they think about visiting Bali.

Ready to learn what to eat? Here is our full Bali Food Guide & Podcast. 

Updated March 2019: Full intro to Traditional Balinese Food, new Balinese Cuisine podcast episode, expanded top 12 Traditional Balinese Food options.

 

Bali Food Guide: Introduction To Traditional Balinese Food

Bali one of 17,508 islands in Indonesia. Much of traditional Balinese food bears resemblance to typical Indonesian food but unlike its mostly Muslim neighbours, Bali is predominantly Hindu which means that they rarely eat beef and have a lot more pork on the menu.

Balinese food is a solid mix of indigenous cuisine as well as influences from Chinese, Indian and Middle Eastern cuisine that sets it apart in many ways from just being “Indonesian food”.

Although Indonesia has a long history of food, it has not been well documented throughout the ages. but we do know that trade with the Middle East, India and China has been going on for a very long time with the Europeans (the Dutch) joining the party later on. It’s been a melting pot of different flavours for quite some time.

Some staples of Balinese food are rice, of course. If you’ve seen images of Bali it most likely will be of their stunning rice fields and terraces. Rice will be something that is included in almost every meal in Bali. Another staple on the dinner table is kecap manis which is a light soy sauce that is used a lot in local cooking. Some other important sauces/spices are:

Balinese Spice Blend – Bumbu Bali

The unique flavor of Traditional Balinese Food comes from the specific local spice blend that is used in many important dishes we’ll discuss below. It’s a complex blend of many different ingredients and the exact spices and proportions can vary significantly from family to family and restaurant to restaurant. Everyone seems to have their own secret recipe!

Ingredients May include: garlic, shallots, chillies, galangal, ginger, turmeric, cumin, coriander seed, kaffir lime leaf, kentjur, cardamom, white pepper, nutmeg, shrimp paste (trassi).

Bumbu Bali can be as a dry spice blend or mixed with oil or fresh wet ingredients to make a paste or sauce.

Sambal – Chili Sauce

Sambal is a chilli sauce or paste typically made from a mixture of a variety of chilli peppers with secondary ingredients such as shrimp paste, fish sauce, garlic, ginger, shallot, scallion, palm sugar, lime juice, and rice vinegar or other vinegar’s. This is what gives a lot of Balinese food it’s kick! Other spices you’ll find in traditional Balinese food is Kaempferia galanga (galangal), turmeric, and Kaffir lime.

 


 

Best Food In Bali: Top 12 Options For Traditional Balinese Food

The most typical dishes from Traditional Balinese Food which you should look out for to try in Bali.

 
Nasi Kampur / Nasi Campur

Traditional Balinese Food: Nasi Kampur / Nasi Campur

Nasi Campur just means mixed rice and it’s a dish you will find on most menus in Bali. It features a scoop of white rice accompanied by small portions of a number of other dishes, including meats, vegetables, peanuts, eggs, and fried shrimp. As there is no rule to how you make this dish I can assure you it will never taste the same twice…

Nasi Campur is popular in many parts of Indonesia. The thing that makes this particularly Balinese is the addition of basa genep which is a very local spice mix that is used as the base for many Balinese curries and vegetable dishes.

Bali Food Guide:  Bebek Goreng (crispy duck)

Bali Food Guide | Best Bali Restaurants & Traditional Balinese Food: Bebek Goreng

Traditional Balinese Food: Bebek Goreng

Bebek Goreng is fried duck often served with rice, sambal, and lalapan which is a raw vegetable salad often consisting of cucumber, lettuce, cabbages, long bean and basil. Ayam Goreng is a similar dish made with chicken.

“In Ubud, Bali, duck is more popular than chicken or pork because ducks live in the numerous rice paddies of the region, helping to kill insects, clean the environment while simultaneously contributing their own waste as fertilizer for the rice.” – Quote from our Bali food podcast episode below.

Traditional Balinese Food: Bebek Betutu / Ayam Betutu

Bali Food Guide | Best Bali Restaurants & Traditional Balinese Food: Bebek Betutu

Traditional Balinese Food: Bebek Betutu

Unlike some of the other dishes on this list, Betutu is 100% Balinese. Its steamed or roasted chicken (ayam) or duck (bebek) in a rich bumbu betutu spice blend. Betutu is a specific spice mix of shallots, garlic, turmeric, ginger, wild ginger, galangal, candle nuts, chili peppers, shrimp paste, and peanuts all finely ground using a mortar and pestle. This paste is then sauteed with coconut oil to release it’s aroma and then rubbed onto either chicken or duck. The meat is then usually wrapped in a banana leaf and then cooked

Tum Be Siap

Bali Food Guide | Best Bali Restaurants & Traditional Balinese Food: Tum Be Siap

Traditional Balinese Food: Tum Be Siap

Tum Be Siap is finely chopped or ground chicken with ginger and a mix of other herbs and spices like garlic, bay leaves, lemongrass, shallots, chilis. Then steamed inside a banana leaf.

Traditional Balinese Food: Babi Guling

Bali Food Guide | Best Bali Restaurants & Traditional Balinese Food: babi guling (Suckling Pig)

Traditional Balinese Food: Babi Guling (Balinese Suckling Pig)

Bali’s love of pork leads to there own specific version of suckling pig. Whole pig is roasted, stuffed with the bumbu bali blend of local spices. A mix of pork pieces is served on one plate.

Bali Food Guide: Sate (Satay)

Bali Food Guide | Best Bali Restaurants & Traditional Balinese Food: Sate (Satay)

Bali Food Guide: Sate (Satay)

Satay originated on the Island of Java in Indonesia but has become massively popular across all the islands. It is said that local street vendors were influenced by the Indian kebab which in itself has its influences from Persian culture. These vendors created their own adaption on the streets of Java, perhaps to please the influx of Indian and Arab spice traders that were frequently visiting. It didn’t take long for it to spread to the other islands including Bali and to surrounding countries of Malaysia and Thailand, Singapore, The Philippines, Brunei and East Timor.

Satay is marinated meat that is skewered, grilled, and commonly served with a peanut sauce. Many people make the mistake of assuming that satay means spicy peanut sauce. In fact, satay can come with many variations of sauce so the actual word refers to the skewers of meat. 

Satay Ayam is probably the most popular form you will find in Bali today and is made with chicken marinated in a mixture of popular Indonesian spices including: coriander, turmeric, lemongrass, garlic, ginger, salt and pepper and of course Indonesia’s favourite condiment – kecap manis!

Nasi Goreng

Bali Food Guide | Best Bali Restaurants & Traditional Balinese Food: Nasi Goreng

Bali Food Guide: Nasi Goreng

Nasi Goreng is a classic Indonesian dish that is popular all over the country. It’s essentially a leftovers dish of wok fried rice with whatever leftover veg and meat is available, mixed with garlic, ginger, kecap manis and some other spices. Normally topped with a fried egg.

Mee Goreng

Bali Food Guide | Best Bali Restaurants & Traditional Balinese Food: Mee Goreng

Bali Food Guide: Mee Goreng

Mee Goreng is an almost identical concept to nasi goreng but made with noodles instead of rice.

Tempeh

Bali Food Guide | Best Bali Restaurants & Traditional Balinese Food: Tempeh

Bali Food Guide: Tempeh (Indonesian Tofu)

Tempeh is another Indonesian dish popular on Bali. Tempeh is made by a natural culturing and controlled fermentation process that binds soybeans into a firm cake form. So it’s similar to tofu but Tempeh is the only major traditional soy food that did not originate from Greater Chinese cuisine.

The invention of Tempe is connected to tofu production in Java. The tofu-making industry was introduced to Java by Chinese immigrants around the 17th century and it’s suggested that tempeh was accidentally produced as the by-product of the tofu industry. Discarded soybeans caught the spores of a whitish fungus that was found to be edible, in fact, delicious!

Pepes Ikan

Bali Food Guide | Best Bali Restaurants & Traditional Balinese Food: Pepes Ikan

Bali Food Guide: Pepes Ikan (Chopped fish steamed in banana leaf)

Another classic Indonesian food. Pepes Ikan is similar to tum be siap, mentioned above, but is made with minced fish and spices, steamed in a banana leaf.

Kari Udang

Kari Udang

Bali Food Guide: Kari Udang (Malaysian / Indonesian/ Balinese Curry)

Kari Udang is a coconut milk based yellow curry made with prawns. Most sources agree Kari Udang could have originated in Malaysia, but it has spread and evolved across Indonesia. Like with many other dishes that could now be said to be traditional Balinese food, Bali has taken the Kari Udang and changed the spice blend to reflect local preference.

Traditional Balinese Food: Lawar

A Traditional Balinese Food made from a mixture of vegetables, coconut and minced meat mixed with rich herbs and spices. Red lawar gets its color because it is mixed with blood. White lawar is it’s non-bloody cousin.

Balinese Dessert: Bubur Injin

Bali Food Guide | Best Bali Restaurants & Traditional Balinese Food: Bubur Injin

Traditional Balinese Food: Bubur Injin (Sweet Black Rice In Coconut Milk)

Bubur Injin is a sweet dessert made from black glutinous rice with coconut milk and palm or cane sugar. It should be noted that the black color isn’t added – Bubur Injin is made from black rice. There are 3 varieties of black rice in the world: Indonesian black rice, Philippine balatinaw rice, and Thai jasmine black rice – so this is something quite special to try while you are visiting Bali.

 


 

Bali Food Guide Podcast: Traditional Balinese Food

  • What are the essential Balinese condiments, spices & fruits?
  • Nasi Kampur – It’s almost like a Balinese tapas buffet
  • The short story of satay (or sate)
  • Why they eat more duck than chicken in Ubud, Bali.
  • Plus, A jet black dessert that rocked our tastebuds…

Listen & Subscribe: iTunes | Spotify | Podbean | Google Play | Stitcher

RSS: https://thedish.podbean.com/feed.xml

Support: Become a Patron | Tweet: @foodfuntravel | Email: [email protected]

THE BELOW CONTENT IS A COMPANION TO THE PODCAST, NOT A TRANSCRIPT
 

Bali Food Guide: The Best Bali Restaurants

From the Locals:

 

Vika  Fitriyana – Indonesian TV adventure program host

My top recommendation for my best restaurants in Bali is Warung Bu Oki, Jimbaran. They only sell traditional Balinese chicken rice and have a long queue for eating there. Taste really good and really cheap ? for a great hangout, I love Sundays Beach Club

Taufan Gio – Editor in Chief at Disgiovery


If you’re in Ubud, please try Nasi Ayam Kadewatan Ibu Mangku (spicy mix Balinese chicken rice) It’s my favourite!

 

 

Ara Akimoto – local artist and painter

EatWell Bali is my favorite restaurant in Seminyak! You must check it out!

 

Nila Tanzil Petersen – Founder and CEO at Travel Sparks Indonesia

Sometimes you just crave good Italian food no matter where you are in the world – Trattoria is my go to place every time! There’s lots of locations so there will most likely be one nearby.

 

Eka Situmorang-Sir – Indonesia Trip Of Wonders Team Member and Blogger at Cerita EKA

Motel Mexicola in Seminyak is cool! You have to check it out!!!

 

Ramon Y. Tungka – Indonesian Actor, Outdoor Activities Enthusiast & Travel Journo

Seminyak has some really funky places to hang out – one of my best restaurants in Bali is Revolver. Great vibes Great Coffee!

 

Experience a mystery dining tour with Bali Food Safari

best restaurants in Bali

best restaurants in Bali

The food tours from Bali Food Safari are the best choice if you’re overwhelmed by the number of amazing places to eat in Bali. But also, when you want to go on a romantic surprise dinner or if you’re an absolute foodie and appreciate a delicious food fest; these tours are exactly what you’re looking for. Bali Food Safari works with a mystery dining concept which means that you don’t know which restaurants you’re going until you’re already on your merry way. Each tour visits 3 or 4 stunning venues in either Jimbaran or Seminyak. If you’re a street food lover than the Bali street food tour has your name written all over it.

Check out all Bali food tours.

 

———————

Bali Food Guide: The Best Bali Restaurants

From the Frequent Travelers:

Soraya Nicholls – Hello Raya

I loved Lilla Warung and Warung Little Bird, which are both in Sanur. Ku De Ta in Seminyak is amazing… if you go upstairs around sunset time, they have an awesome 5-course dinner. I also loved Warung Bernadette in Ubud, which has some delicious beef rendang.

Vicki Garside – Make Time To See The World

Mamasan in Seminyak, Bali, is one of the coolest places I have ever eaten!
Low light, dark wood, metal trim tables and a large mural on the back wall make for a great first impression as you walk through the heavy wooden double doors. The staff are professional, attentive and so polished – you could easily believe you were in a 5* restaurant anywhere in the Western world. And the menu is huge and so varied – entrees include sugarcane prawns, steamed snapper buns, peeking duck and pork belly and mains are a variety of salads, curries & braises, stir fry and crispy meat, fish and vegetables.

The food is incredible – and don’t even get me started on the cocktails!

best restaurants in Bali

best restaurants in Bali

 

Ivana & Gianni – Nomad Is Beautiful

Dayu’s Warung, Ubud

The place is named after its owner Dayu, who has a long history with cooking and was trained by nutrition experts. Her local restaurant is a cool little hippie spot hidden from touristy raw-food restaurants in the centre of Ubud. You’ll love comfortable cushions and most importantly, Dayu’s organic food!

Dayu’s Warung has only has a few tables, and you’ll find here a fusion of Balinese, Indian, Mexican and Italian dishes. If you love intensive smell and taste of spices, go for an Indian dish! Prices are quite reasonable. As Dayu says, “food is life,” and you’ll certainly get on your plate something that will make you feel revitalized.

Bali Food Guide - The Best Bali Restaurants - best restaurants in Bali

best restaurants in Bali

Mar Pages – Once in a Lifetime Journey

No trip to Bali can be complete without a trip to Naughty Nuri for barbecue pork ribs you can get your fingers sticky on. Sit down in this hole in the wall of a place in Ubud where you will most likely share the table with other customers and shake your own martini.

Naughty Nuri is known for its delicious pork ribs and for the martinis that may seem like a strange pairing but did work very well. I suspect the naughtiness may come from the combination of dirty ribs and dirty martinis.

Not as much a fancy place but you surely didn’t go to Nuri’s for the refined dining but to get your hands dirty.

Naughty Nuri has been so successful that they have even opened outlets overseas, in Singapore.

Bali Food Guide - The Best Bali Restaurants - best restaurants in Bali

best restaurants in Bali

Sharon Gourlay – Where’s Sharon

Pandan Sari, Jimbaran Beach

The best place to eat in Bali, in my opinion, is at one of the seafood shacks that line Jimbaran Beach – our favourite is Pandan Sari.

Jimbaran Beach is beautiful and a nice place to visit in itself. However, if you love fresh seafood then you are in for a special treat. Every evening, many “Seafood shacks” open up on this beach with many mouth watering options.

Dinner is served on tables right on the beach, so you not only get delicious food but a beautiful setting as the sun sets. The prices are also very good.

You get to choose your seafood which is then BBQ’d in special sauces. We especially recommend getting a set meal. This is cost effective and gives you lots of yummy things to try.

Bali Food Guide - The Best Bali Restaurants - best restaurants in Bali

best restaurants in Bali

Sarah – Fit Travels

Sky Garden – Kuta

Sky Garden nightclub in Kuta is probably not the place you think of when it comes to eating out in Bali. But if you’re after something substantial, plenty of variety and included drinks then look no further than their nightly all you can eat (and drink) BBQ. Every evening from 5pm – 9pm , hungry travellers pay their 115,000IDR (less than 9USD!) to dine on the rooftop with free flow beer, cider and spirits. Each night is themed ranging from Mexican to a traditional Sunday roast. We often find ourselves a bit torn now when heading out for dinner if we’re in the area as the value is just too good! We’ve had a lot of fun here mingling with other patrons and would recommend it for people of any age, including families. Just be careful heading back down the stairs after all those drinks.

best restaurants in Bali

best restaurants in Bali

 

Lyn & Steve Baker – A Hole in My Shoe

Yuyake Teppanyaki Legian Beach Hotel

What can I say apart from you MUST try this place. Teppanyaki is a personal dining style where a chef cooks the food in front of you. Yuyake is a place where eating is fun, entertaining and delicious. Our chef was amazing, he prepared great food, putting his skills on display slicing, dicing, juggling and using the tools of his trade. He was brilliant and kept us all well fed and laughing all night. The kids were amazed watching adults ‘playing with their food’ and we soon learnt why there were bibs for each of us. Live entertainment comes courtesy of the chef, who is not only a skilled teppanyaki chef but also great at keeping us amused. We were all mesmerised by the food artistry, his chopping skills and the balancing and juggling of the utensils. It was so much fun watching as the food was flipped, tossed and turned into yummy perfection. He involved each of us at the table, inviting us all to participate, creating a wonderful performance. Such a great night and so worth it, can’t wait to return.

Bali Food Guide - The Best Bali Restaurants

Finally….what do we at Food Fun Travel think is The Best Bali Restaurant?

Petani Restaurant – Ubud 

What can we say – we have a soft spot for crispy duck and Petani Restaurant offers some of the best crispy duck in Ubud. We tried the duck at a few different restaurants and Petani had the perfect mix of crispy skin on the outside while still keeping the flesh juicy and succulent. Absolutely Food Worth Traveling For!

Bali Food Guide - The Best Bali Restaurants - best restaurants in Bali

best restaurants in Bali

Want to hear more about the food being dished up at Petani Restaurant? More food porn awaits you HERE

Love this post? Why not pin it on your fav foodie Pinterest board!

Bali Food Guide - Locals & Frequent Travelers reveal the Best Bali restaurants

 

 

We’ve been to 85+ countries.

What’s our TOP 10 Foodie Destinations?

Sign up to our newsletter to get your FREE PDF & find out!



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